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Posts Tagged ‘Vampire’

Michael Sims – Dracula’s Guest

Posted by demonik on September 13, 2011

Michael Sims (ed.) – Dracula’s Guest: A Connoisseur’s Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories (Bloomsbury, 2010)

Victoria Sawdon

Cover illustration: Victoria Sawdon

Michael Sims – Introduction: The Cost Of Living

Part One: The Roots

Jean-Baptise de Moyer, Marquis d’Argens – They Opened The Graves
Antoine Augustin Calmet – Dead Persons In Hungary
George Gordon, Lord Byron – The End Of My Journey
John Polidori – The Vampyre
Johann Ludwig Tieck (attributed [almost certainly wrongly]) – Wake Not The Dead
Theophile Gautier – The Deathly Lover

Part Two: The Tree

Aleksei Tolstoy – The Family Of The Vourdalak
James Malcolm Rymer – Varney The Vampyre (extract)
Fitz-James O’Brien – What Was It?
Anonymous – The Mysterious Stranger
Anne Crawford – A Mystery of the Campagna
Emily Gerard – Death And Burial – Vampires And Werewolves
Mary Cholmondeley – Let Loose
Eric Count Stenbock – A True Story of a Vampire
M. E. Braddon – Good Lady Ducayne
Augustus Hare – And The Creature Came In
F. G. Loring – The Tomb of Sarah
Hume Nisbet – The Vampire Maid

Part Three: The Fruit

Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman – Luella Miller
M. R. James – Count Magnus
Alice and Claude Askew – Aylmer Vance and the Vampire
Bram Stoker – Dracula’s Guest

Acknowledgements
Bibliography & Further Reading

From the Blurb
Before Twilight and True Blood, vampires haunted the nineteenth century, when brilliant writers everywhere indulged their bloodthirsty imaginations, culminating in Bram Stoker’s legendary 1897 novel, Dracula.

Acclaimed author and anthologist Michael Sims brings together the finest vampire stories of the Victorian era in a unique collection that highlights their cultural variety. Beginning with the supposedly true accounts that captivated Byron and Shelley, the stories range from Aleksei Tolstoy’s tale of a vampire family to Fitz-James O’Brien’s invisible monster to Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s sinister widow Good Lady Ducayne. Sims also includes a nineteenth-century travel tour of Transylvanian superstitions, and rounds out the collection with Stoker’s own Dracula’s Guest – a chapter omitted from his landmark novel.

Posted in *Bloomsbury*, Michael Sims, Young Adult | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Adele Olivia Gladwell – Blood and Roses

Posted by demonik on September 25, 2009

Adele Olivia Gladwell (ed.) – Blood And Roses: The Vampire In 19th Century Literature (Creation Press, 1992)

bloodandroses

Introduction : The Erogenous Disease

John Polidori – The Vampyre
Charles Nodier – Smarra (excerpt)
Theophile Gautier – The Beautiful Dead
Edgar Allan Poe – Ligeia
J.M. Rymer – The Feast of Blood (excerpt)
Charlotte Bronte – Jane Eyre (excerpts)
Charles Baudelaire – The Vampire’s Metamorphosis
Edward Bulwer Lytton – The House and the Brain
Ivan Turgenev – Phantoms
Isadore Ducasse – Maldoror
Sheridan Le fanu – Carmilla
Guy de Maupassant – The Horla
Huysmans – La-Bas (excerpt)
Oscar Wilde – The Picture of Dorian Gray (excerpt)
Arthur Machen – The Inmost Light
Count Stenbock – The True Story of a Vampire
Bram Stoker – Dracula (excerpts)

Thanks to James Doig for providing the cover scan and contents.

Posted in *Creation*, Adele Olivia Gladwell | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Trisha Telep – Mammoth Book of Vampire Romance

Posted by demonik on October 9, 2008

Trisha Telep (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Vampire Romance (Constable & Robinson, July 2008)


[image]

Sherri Erwin – Fade To Black
Caitlin R. Kiernan – Ode To Edvard Munch
Jenna Black – Fangs For Hire
Jenna Maclaine – The Righteous
Raven Hart – Knowledge Of Evil
Delia Devlin – Viper’s Bite
Keri Arthur – Dreams
Kimberley Raye – Love Bites
Alexis Morgan – What’s At Stake
Lilith Saintcrow – Coming Home
C.T Adams & Cathy Clamp – To Ease The Rage
Susan Sizemore – Dancing With The Star
Dina James – Play Dead
Colleen Gleason – In Which A Masquerade Ball Unmasks An Undead
Barbara Emrys – A Temporary Vampire
Savannah Russe – Overbite
Shiloh Walker – Hunter’s Choice
Vicki Pettersson – Remember The Blood
Rebecca York – The Sacrifice
Rachel Vincent – The Midday Mangler Meets His Match
Amanda Ashley – The Music Of The Night
Karen Chance – The Day Of The Dead
Nancy Holder – Vampire Unchained
Lilith Saintcrow – A Stand-Up Dame
Caitlin R. Kiernan – Untitled 12

Author Biographies

Blurb:

Twenty-five new short stories of hot blood, midnight pleasures and inhuman passion. Paranormal romance is currently the fastest-growing new fiction genre – vampire romance is its most popular form. Top names include Caitlin R. Kiernan, Lilith Saintcrow, Karen Chance, and Keri Arthur.

The specially commissioned stories include: Susan Sizemore’s Dancing With The Star: An LA vampire meets the (dying) movie star of her dreams.
CT Adams and Cathy Clamp’s To Ease the Rage: Even vampires need a police force.
Amanda Ashley’s The Music of the Night: The Phantom of the Opera‘s biggest fan gets up close and personal

The Book
from the biggest names in vampire romance, here are 25 new tales of a hunger like no other. Paranormal romance s now a supernatural force to be reckoned with. Although packed with a menagerie of werewolves, shape-shifters, and assorted demons, its undisputed king is none other than our favourite bloodsucker – the vampire.

Let Karen Chance, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Lilith Saintcrow, Keri Arthur, Kimberley Raye, Vicki Pettersson and others take you hot-blooded on the trail of the sexiest creatures of the night. Witness the bewildering array of complex vampire codes of conduct, dark ritual and dating practices as they seduce the locals and engage in the most sensual encounters you will sink your teeth into this some of the grave.

The Editor
Trisha Telep manages the romance section of the world-famous Murder One bookshop in London, which specializes in American imports. She is co-author of The Mammoth Book of the Kama Sutra.

Posted in "Constable-Robinson*, Trisha Telep | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

forthcoming publications from Constable-Robinson

Posted by demonik on June 18, 2008

Exciting forcoming publications from Constable-Robinson include a posthumous Peter Haining collection on …. what else? True Hauntings!

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[image]

Trisha Telep (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Vampire Romance (July, 2008)

Paranormal romance is a supernatural force to be reckoned with. Although packed with a menagerie of werewolves, shapeshifters and assorted demons, its undisputed king is none other than our favourite centuries-old bloodsucker – the vampire.

We’re now living in a post-Buffy world of dark urban fantasy à la Laurell K. Hamilton’s Anita Blake, Sherrilyn Kenyon’s irresistible Dark Hunters and the blood-lusting soul mates of Christine Feehan.

But it doesn’t stop there. This Mammoth collection opens a vein to reveal the mind-boggling scope of the supercharged phenomenon created when vampires met romance.

Let the biggest and brightest names in the paranormal romance business take you hot on the haemoglobin trail of the sexiest creatures of the night. Witness the bewildering array of complex vampire codes of conduct, dark ritual and dating practices, as they chat up the locals and engage in the most erotic encounters you will sink your teeth into this side of un-Death. These ain’t your mother’s vampires!.

Peter Haining (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings (October, 2008)

This giant collection includes a huge range of 20th-century first-hand accounts of hauntings, such as the American troops who repeatedly saw the ghosts of a dead platoon of men while on patrol in Vietnam; and the witnessed haunting of a house near Tintagel in Cornwall that led actress Kate Winslet to pull out of buying the property.

It covers the full spectrum of credible hauntings, from poltergeists (the noisy, dangerous and frightening spirits that are usually associated with pubescent girls, like the Bell Witch), to phantoms (like the Afrits of Saudi Arabia) and seduction spirits (such as the Lorelei, which have lured German men to death).

Also included are the notes of the most famous ghost hunters of the twentieth century such as Hans Holzer, Susy Smith (USA); Harry Price, Jenny Randles (UK); Joyce Zwarycz (Australia), Eric Rosenthal (South Africa), and Hwee Tan (Japan).

Plus essays by such names as Robert Graves, Edgar Cayce, and M. R. James outlining their own – often extraordinary – conclusions as to just what ghosts might be; along with a full bibliography and list of useful resources.

[image] Mammoth Best New Horror 19

David Kendall (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics (October, 2008)

You can’t keep a good (or bad) corpse down, and they rise up in spectacular form in this new collection.

The mindless, shambling zombies of yesteryear are rapidly being replaced by sprinters and runners with an insatiable appetite for human flesh. These days zombies are the rock and roll of horror monsters.

Presenting a mix of voodoo victims, creepy somnambulists, and flesh eating, rock n roll deadheads, The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics brings you the best the graveyard can give. From film sources and literary sources to some very strange sources, here over 20 of the best zombie comics ever produced.

They include the first Vince Locke Deadworld comic, Scott Hampton’s awesome adaptation of RE Howard’s Pigeons From Hell, plus stories from Steve Niles, Darko Macan, and many, many more.

If it’s dead, moving and hungry, you’ll find it here!

Currently Available


Jon Lewis – The Mammoth Book of Boys Own Stuff
Maxim Jakubowski – The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper
Peter Normanton – The Mammoth Book of Best Horror Comics
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of Modern Ghost Stories
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of Haunted House Stories
Arthur Veno – The Mammoth Book of Bikers
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 18
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 17
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 16
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 15
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Monsters

How to spot a Robinson’s Mammoth

1. It will have the word ‘Mammoth’ included in the title.

Robinson Logo

Fig. A

2. There will be a ‘Robinsons’ logo on the spine (see Fig. A).

A randomly selected ‘Mammoth’ cover to further assist you in identifying one.

erotica600

Thanks to Sam at Constable-Robinson!

Posted in *Constable/Robinson* | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Richard Dalby – Dracula’s Brood

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Richard Dalby (ed.) – Dracula’s Brood: Rare Vampire Stories by Friends and Contemporaries of Bram Stoker (Crucible, 1987, Equation, 1989)

Dracula’s Brood crucible

Introduction – Richard Dalby

William Gilbert – The Last Lords of Gardonal
Eliza Lynn Linton – The Fate of Madame Cabanel
Phil Robinson – The Man-Eating Tree
Vasile Alecsandrai – The Vampyre
Anne Crawford – A Mystery of the Campagna
Julian Hawthorne – Ken’s Mystery
Arthur Conan Doyle – The Parasite
Mary Elizabeth Braddon – Good Lady Ducayne
Mary Cholmondeley – Let Loose
Vincent O’Sullivan – Will
H. B. Marriott Watson – The Stone Chamber
Hume Nisbet – The Vampire Maid
Hume Nisbet – The Old Portrait
Vernon Lee – Marsyas in Flanders
Louise J. Strong – An Unscientific Story
Sabine Baring-Gould – A Dead Finger
Horacio Quiroga – The Feather Pillow
Algernon Blackwood – The Singular Death of Morton
Alice & Claude Askew – Aylmer Vance and the Vampire
Ulric Daubeny – The Sumach
M. R. James – Wailing Well
Edward Heron-Allen – Another Squaw?
E. R. Punshon – The Living Stone
Frederick Cowles – Princess Of Darkness

Eliza Lynn Linton – The Fate Of Madame Cabenal: Pievrot, a hamlet in Brittany. Jules Cabanel, father of his housekeeper Adele’s child, returns from Paris with an English bride. Adele welcomes her new mistress with a bouquet of scarlet poppies, belladonna and aconite, and, in concert with Martin Briolic, is soon plotting her rivals downfall. The high rate of infant mortality in the region gives them all the ammunition they need …

Frederick Cowles – Princess Of Darkness: Now we’re in Budapest, and the clutches of the 400 year old Transylvanian Princess Bessenyei, so no prizes for guessing she’s a full on vampire with all the trappings. Wherever she goes, she leaves a trail of dead lovers in her wake until Harry Gorton, an English diplomat, teams up with his occultist friend Istvan Zichy join forces against her. A marvelous pulp romp with a suspenseful climax, and it’s possible you won’t double guess the ending.

E. R. Punshon – The Living Stone: “What could any man do against fifty tons of granite made animate?” Good question, especially when it flings itself upon you with a great leap and gluts on your blood. The professor, researching human sacrifice in Cornwall, stakes out the ‘hunting stone’ in Missing Lane following a series of mysterious disappearances in the locality.

Hume Nisbet – The Old Portrait: Utterly charming Victorian horror. When he scrubs away the “bloated, piggish visage of a landlord” from the canvas, he discovers the masterly portrait of a beautiful woman underneath. Fascinated, he spends Christmas Eve gazing at his find. Come midnight, and the lovely lady comes floating out of the frame..

Hume Nisbet – The Vampire Maid: A reclusive artist takes up residence in a cottage and falls for the attractive invalid Ariadne Brunnell. Her health begins to return.

Mary Elizabeth Braddon – Good Lady Ducayne: Bella lands the position of ladies maid to the ancient, wizened Adelaide Ducayne, and spends the winter touring Italy with her and sinister physician Dr. Parravicini. The old girl’s is soon dramatically improved, although Bella isn’t feeling too clever ….

Edward Heron-Allen – Another Squaw?: Title alludes to Stokers horrible tale of the American tourist, the cat and the Iron Maiden. This one is set at a Marine Biological Station, and relates the events leading to the death of Jennifer Pendeen B.Sc., savaged by an Angler fish.

Mary Cholmondeley – Let Loose: Wet-Waste-On-The-Wold, Yorkshire. When Sir Roger Despard, a man of many vices, lay on his deathbed, he did so denying God and his Angels, declaring that all were damned as he, and that Satan was strangling him to death. Taking a knife, he cut off his hand and swore an oath that, if he were to go down and burn in hell, his hand would roam the earth and throttle others as he was being throttled. Thirty years after his death, a young man persuades an old clergyman to open the crypt …

Horacio Quiroga – The Feather Pillow: Even given the heady standards set by the The Living Stone, The Sumach (an excellent ‘vampire tree’ outing) and Another Squaw?, this one is pretty bizarre. Recently wed, Alicia is wasting away before the eyes of her dominant husband. What could be causing her illness? (Clue: it isn’t a haunted hot-water bottle).

Alice & Claude Askew – Aylmer Vance and the Vampire: Hereditary vampirism in the Scottish Highlands. Paul marries beautiful redhead Jessica MacThane, the last of her clan, who bears a striking resemblance to her ancestress, Zaida the witch, the wife of a murderer. Since Zaida’s day, the legend has persisted of “a pale woman clad in white, flitting about the cottages at night, and where she passed, sickness and death were sure to intervene …”

H. B. Marriott Watson – The Stone Chamber: Utterbourne Village, Devon. Rupert Marvin, an eighteenth century rake and murderer, does his little bit to upset the wedding plans of the besotted Warrington and Marion. You’ll most likely prefer Warrington when he’s demonically possessed by the vampire, boozing, cursing and pawing every woman in sight. Not a patch on the same author’s The Devil On The Marsh, but good fun none-the-less.

Sabine Baring Gould – The Dead Finger: When it comes to leftie-haters, very few could outdo Dennis Wheatley, but the Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould certainly gave it his best shot in this 1904 shocker. Who is to blame for the vampiric digit which persecutes our narrator so? As the undead himself explains: whinging paupers!

“Folk once called us Anarchists, Nihilists, Socialists, Levelers, now they call us the Influenza …. we the social failures, the generally discontented, coming up out of our cheap and nasty graves in the form of physical disease.”

I’d so have that engraved on my headstone if only I could afford one!

Dracula’s Brood

see also the Dracula’s Brood thread on the Vault forum

Posted in *Crucible*, Richard Dalby | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »