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British Horror fiction

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Posts Tagged ‘paperback’

21st Zardoz Paperbook & Pulp Fair: Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Posted by demonik on July 6, 2010

21st Zardoz Paperbook & Pulp Fair: Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Zardoz Pulp Fair 2010

i really can’t think of a better way to spend Halloween – which almost certainly means i’ll miss it again. hopefully, some of you will have better luck!

Sunday 31st October 2010
Park Plaza Hotel, 239 Vauxhall Bridge Road, London SW1V 1EQ. Nearest station: Victoria.
10 am – 4pm
Dealer Tables: £50 each
Admission: £3

further details: www.zardozbooks.co.uk

Posted in Forthcoming Events, News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Fred Pickersgill – And Graves Give Up Their Dead

Posted by demonik on June 29, 2010

Fred Pickersgill (ed.) – And Graves Give Up Their Dead (Corgi, 1964)

 Photograph: Dunstan Pereira

Photograph: Dunstan Pereira

William Link & William Levinson – Top Flight Aquarium
Gerald Bullett – the Elder
Roald Dahl – Royal Jelly
Charles Beaumont – Miss Gentilbelle
Richard Matheson – Girl Of My Dreams
Ambrose Birece – An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge
Robert Arthur – Death Is A Dream
Richard Davis – the Female Of The Species
John Collier – De Mortius
Wilbur Daniel Steele – Footfalls

Posted in *Corgi*, Frederick Pickersgill | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Horror Stories: By The Greatest Masters Of The Gruesome

Posted by demonik on January 16, 2010

Anonymous (ed.) – Horror Stories: By The Greatest Masters Of The Gruesome (Paul Elek Bestseller Library, 1962)

Alexander Woolcott – Midnight Sonata
Arthur Machen – The Novel Of The Black Seal
E. F. Benson – Mrs. Amworth
F. Marion Crawford – The Upper Berth
H. P. Lovecraft – The Dunwich Horror
Guy de Maupassant – Was It a Dream?
Bram Stoker – The Judges House
Charles Collins & Charles Dickens – The Trial For Murder
J. F. Sullivan – The Man With A Malady
Anonymous – Sawney Beane and His Family
Bram Stoker – The Squaw
A. J. Alan – The Hair
Fitz-James O’Brien – What Was It?
H. G. Wells – The Cone
F. Marion Crawford – The Screaming Skull

Blurb

Warning
If these tales are read late at night when the reader is alone in the house, the publishers will not he responsible for the consequences.

and nor will i be held accountable for posting ’em here!

Perhaps the most interesting thing to be said for this selection is that the contents are identical to  The Arrow Book Of Horror Stories (1965)

Posted in *Paul Elek*, Anonymous | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Wordsworth Editions: Best publisher of the 00’s?

Posted by demonik on December 21, 2009

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As far as i know they’ve never even been shortlisted for a British Fantasy Award but Wordsworth editions have my nomination for publishers of the decade. The good news is, the good work will continue just as soon as 2010 is upon us with a reprint of James Malcolm Rymer’s Varney The Vampyre in January followed by the James Doig edited anthology, Australian Ghost Stories, the following month.

[image]

Blurb
Murderous ghosts, horrific curses and monstrous beings haunt an unforgiving landscape into which travelers stray at their peril. Journey through the dark byways of Australia’s Gothic past in the rare stories gathered in this memorable new collection. Work by acclaimed Australian writers such as Marcus Clarke, Henry Lawson and Edward Dyson appears alongside many lesser-known authors such as Beatrice Grimshaw, Mary Fortune and Ernest Favenc. Many of the stories collected here have never been reprinted since their first publication in 19th and early 20th century periodicals and showcase the richness and variety of the Australian ghost and horror story.

James Doig provides an authoritative introduction full of fresh insights into Australian Gothic fiction with detailed biographical notes on the authors represented.

my pick of those i’ve read to date would include:

M. G. Lewis – The Monk
Mark Valentine (ed) – The Werewolf Pack
David S. Davies (ed.) – The Sexton Blake Casebook
Marjorie Bowen – The Bishop Of Hell
Anonymous – Sweeney Todd
E. Nesbit – Powers Of Darkness
George W. M. Reynolds – Wagner, The Werewolf
William Fryer Harvey – The Beast With Five Fingers
David Blair (ed.) – Gothic Short Stories
Dennis Wheatley – The Devil Rides Out

Happy Christmas and thanks for such a great selection, Derek and skeleton staff!

Posted in *Wordsworth" | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Gary Fry – Poe’s Progeny

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Gary Fry (ed.) – Poe’s Progeny (Gray Friars Press, Sept. 2005)

Robert Sammelin

Michael Marshall Smith – Introduction

Mike O’Driscoll – The Hurting House
Mark Morris – The Places They Hide
Antony Mann – Save The Snutch
Melvin Cartagena – Bottom Feeders
Tim Lebbon – A Ripple In The Veil
Steve Savile – Idiot Hearts
Joel Lane – A Night On Fire
Greg Beatty – Dr Jackman’s Lens
Chico Kidd – Unfinished Business
Conrad Williams – Once Seen
Jon Hartless – Earth, Water, Oil
Nicholas Royle – Sitting Tenant
Kathy Sedia – Making Ivy
Dominick Cancilla – The Cubicle Wall
Stephen Volk – The Good Unknown
Gary Fry – The Strange Case Of Jack Myride And Company
Andrew Hook – The Pregnant Sky
Gene Stewart – Evidence
Rhys Hughes – The Jam Of Hypnos
Gary McMahon – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Adam L. G. Nevill – Where Angels Come In
John L. Probert – The Volkendorf Exhibition
Allen Ashley – Turbulent Times
Richard Gavin – The Pale Lover
Kevin L. Donihe – Living Room Zombies
Neil Ayres – The Scent Of Nostalgia
Robert Swartwood – Goodbye
Simon Clark – One Man Show
Donald R. Burleson – Papa Loaty
Ramsey Campbell – Just Behind You

Blurb:

Too often contemporary horror fiction denies, forgets or is even unaware of its roots in classic dark literature. The man legitimately called the father of the genre, Edgar Allan Poe, thrust terror into the soul of humanity, while his illegitimate descendants located it in the cosmos, across nations, in science, through history, in nature, in the city — in short, wherever people come together and invariably attempt to dull their imaginations. But experience is always too cruel.

These themes are of course relevant today.

This book aims to show how the ideas and techniques of the greats might be utilised to explore the modern world. Here you’ll find neither pastiche nor period prose, rather thoroughly contemporary visions whose aging, tell-tale heart still beats with dismaying memory of the past and irrepressible fear for the future…

30 original stories from some of the finest practitioners in the field, including a brand new tale from modern master Ramsey Campbell.

Posted in *Gray Friar Press*, Gary Fry | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Gary Fry – Bernie Herrmann’s Manic Sextet

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Gary Fry (ed.) – Bernie Herrmann’s Manic Sextet (Gray Friars, Dec. 2005)

Ben Baldwin

Mike O’Driscoll – Introduction

Paul Finch – Hobhook
Donald Pulker – Forced Perspective
Andrew Hook – Live From The Hippodrome
Gary McMahon – Like A Stone
Adam L. G. Nevill – The Other Occupant
Rhys Hughes – The Hydrothermal Reich
Simon Strantzas – Fading Light

Blurb

Edgar Allan Poe suggested that the short story was the ideal vehicle for the dark tale, yet some of the finest ever written — to take just two examples, Algernon Blackwood’s ‘The Willows’ and H. P. Lovecraft’s ‘The Colour Out Of Space’ — are far longer. The novella, or novelette, is an enduringly popular form in the field of imaginative literature, yet few books celebrate it exclusively.

This collection seeks to show how the longer short story, or the very short novel, is ideally suited to the demands of creating an atmosphere, telling an involving tale, and developing compelling characters. The authors here are all masters of their craft: they know how to combine economy with broad visions of fear.

Let their chill melody seduce you; discordant imagery awaits; infectious rhythms will drive you wild with dread.

Six outstanding pieces from some of today’s bleakest prodigies. Let the music commence…

Posted in *Gray Friar Press*, Gary Fry | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Peter Haining – Summoned From The Tomb Digit, 1966

Posted by demonik on October 23, 2009

Peter Haining (ed) – Summoned From The Tomb (Digit, 1966)

summonedfromtombdigit

Introduction – Peter Haining

Robert Bloch – Hell On Earth *
Washington Irving – Guests From Gibbet Island
Bram Stoker – The Judges House
J. S. Le Fanu – The Bully Of Chapelizod
Ivar Jorgensen – The Curse  *
Alexander Pushkin – The Coffin-Maker
Clive Pemberton – “Purple Eyes” *
Ambrose Bierce – A Watcher By The Dead
August Derleth – The Whippoorwills In The Hills
Edgar Allan Poe – Hop-Frog

A “Screaming Shuddering Spine-chilling TEN horror classics by the great masters of suspense” no less, including three stories (*) which didn’t make it into the later, much expanded hardback (Sidgwick & Jackson, 1973).  Groovy graveyard cover artwork too!

See also the Summoned From The Tomb thread on the Vault of Evil forum.

Posted in *Digit*, Peter Haining | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Stephen Jones – Mammoth Book Of Wolf Men

Posted by demonik on September 4, 2009

Stephen Jones (ed.) – The Mammoth Book Of Wolf Men (Robinson/ Running Press, 2009:  Originally published as The Mammoth Book Of Werewolves, 1994)

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Cover:  Joe Roberts

Introduction: Even a Man Who is Pure in Heart – Stephen Jones

Clive Barker – Twilight at the Towers
Scott Bradfield – The Dream of the Wolf
Ramsey Campbell – Night Beat
Angus Campbell (R. Chetwynd-Hayes) -The Werewolf
Michael Marshall-Smith – Rain Falls
Stephen Laws – Guilty Party
Roberta Lannes – Essence of the Beast
Mark Morris – Immortal
Basil Copper – Cry Wolf
Graham Masterton – Rug
Justin Case (Hugh B. Cave) – The Whisperers
David Sutton – And I Shall Go in the Devil’s Name
Peter Tremayne – The Foxes of Fascoum
Karl Edward Wagner – One Paris Night
Brian Mooney – Soul of the Wolf
Gans T. Field (Manly Wade Wellman) – The Hairy Ones Shall Dance
Adrian Cole – Heart of the Beast
Les Daniels – Wereman (aka ‘By the Light of the Silvery Moon’)
Nicholas Royle – Anything But Your Kind
Dennis Etchison – The Nighthawk
David Case – The Cell
Suzy McKee Charnas – Boobs
Neil Gaiman – Only The End Of The World Again
Kim Newman – Out of the Night, When the Full Moon is Bright…

Jo Fletcher – Bright of Moon (verse)

See also Vault’s Mammoth Book Of The Werewolf/ Wolf Men combo thread.

Posted in *Constable/Robinson*, Stephen Jones | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Stephen Jones – Mammoth Best New Horror 20

Posted by demonik on August 25, 2009

Coming in October 2009!

Stephen Jones (ed.) – Mammoth Book Of Best New Horrror #20 (Robinson, October, 2009)

 

Cover design: JoeRoberts.co.uk Cover artwork: Vincent Chong

Stephen Jones – Introduction:  Horror in 2008

Peter Crowther – Front Page McGuffin And The Greater Story Never Told
Simon Strantzas – It Runs Beneath The Surface
Lynda E. Rucker – These Things We Have Always Known
Neil Gaiman – Feminine Endings
Gary McMahon – Through The Cracks
Tim Lebbon – Falling Off The World
Paul Finch – The Old Traditions Are Best
Ramsey Campbell – The Long Way
Michael Bishop – The Pile
Tanith Lee – Under Fog
Christopher Fowler – Arkangel
Ian R. MacLeod – The Camping Wainwrights
Reggie Oliver – A Donkey At The Mysteries
Steve Duffy – The Oram County Whoosit
Stephen King – The New York Times At Special Bargain Rates
Sarah Pinborough – Our Man In The Sudan
Mark Samuels – Destination Nihil by Edmund Bertrand
Albert E. Cowdrey – The Overseer
Pinckney Benedict – The Beginnings Of Sorrow
Brian Lumley – The Place Of Waiting
Steve Rasnic Tem – 2:PM The Real Estate Agent Arrives

Stephen Jones & Kim Newman – Necrology: 2008
Useful Addresses

Blurb:

The Twentieth Anniversary Edition of the World’s Premier Annual Showcase of Horror and Dark Fantasy fiction.

The year’s best – and darkest – tales of terror, showcasing the most outstanding new short stories and novellas by both contemporary masters of the macabre and exciting newcomers, including lain R. MacLeod, Sarah Pinborough, Mark Samuels, Albert E. Cowdrey, Peter Crowther, Paul Finch, Gary McMahon, Reggie Oliver, Simon Strantzas, Tim Lebbon and Steve Rasnic Tem.

As ever, this acclaimed anthology also offers the most comprehensive annual overview of horror around the world in all -its incarnations, a comprehensive necrology of famous names, and a list of indispensable contact addresses for the dedicated horror fan and writer alike.
The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror remains the world’s leading annual anthology dedicated solely to presenting the best in contemporary horror fiction.

`The Best New Horror series continues to break from the herd, consistently raising the bar of quality and ingenuity.’ Rue Morgue Magazine
`If you want to see who’s up and coming in the genre, then this is your book.’ Publishing News

www.constablerobinson.com

Thanks to Sam and Georgie for their continued kindness and support!

Posted in "Constable-Robinson*, *Constable/Robinson*, Stephen Jones | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Peter Haining – Witchcraft And Black Magic

Posted by demonik on June 21, 2009

Peter Haining – Witchcraft And Black Magic (Hamlyn, 1971)

Illustrations: Jan Parker

Illustrations: Jan Parker

Foreword

The History Of Witchcraft to 1736
The Facets Of Witchcraft
Modern Witchcraft & Black Magic
Books To Read
Index

Blurb:

Peter Haining has been writing about witchcraft and Black Magic for ten years now. It all began when he was working in Essex as a journalist and was asked to cover an outbreak of church desecration in the county. He met self-confessed witches and witnessed many ceremonies in the course of writing that article and, as a result of what he had seen, he became very dissatisfied with the mixture of half-truth, rumour and sensationalism surrounding the subject. Since then, in his many broadcasts and newspaper articles and now in this he has argued for a more practical realistic attitude to witchcraft.

Fertility rite or devil worship? The true purpose of witchcraft has always been debated. Peter Haining believes that witchcraft is an ancient fertility religion and has written a refreshinglystraightforward survey of the subject. He tells the story of witchcraft from prehistory to the present day, explains its association with Black Magic, and investigates many of the strange practices and phenomena which have been attributed to the craft. Exciting illustrations contribute to this lively account of one man’s most intriguing, most misrepresented, activities.

Posted in *Hamlyn*, non-fiction, Peter Haining | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »