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Posts Tagged ‘Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’

Susan Hill (ed.) – Ghost Stories

Posted by demonik on March 12, 2015

Susan Hill (ed.) – Ghost Stories  (Hamish Hamilton, 1983)

susanhillghoststories1

Susan Hill – Introduction

Algernon Blackwood – Keeping His Promise
Elizabeth Bowen – The Demon Lover
Rhoda Broughton – The Man with the Nose
Wilkie Collins – The Dream Woman
Charles Dickens – The Signal-Man
Mrs. Gaskell – The Old Nurse’s Story
Henry James – Sir Edmund Orme
M. R. James – “Oh, Whistle, and I’ll Come to You, My Lad”
Rudyard Kipling – “They”
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu – Green Tea
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu – The White Cat of Drumgunniol
H. G. Wells – The Story of the Inexperienced Ghost
Edith Wharton – All Souls’

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Posted in *Hamish Hamilton*, Susan Hill | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Chris Baldick & Robert Morrison – John Polidori: The Vampyre & Others

Posted by demonik on January 15, 2010

Chris Baldick & Robert Morrison  (eds.) – John Polidori:  The Vampyre & Other Tales Of The Macabre (Oxford University Press, 2008)

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Notes On The Text
Selected Bibliography
Chronology Of The Magazines

John Polidori – The Vampyre
Horace Smith – Sir Guy Eveling’s Dream
William Carleton – Confessions Of A Reformed Ribbonman
Edward Bulwer – Monos And Daimonos
Allan Cunningham – The Master Of Logan
Anonymous – The Victim
James Hogg – Some Terrible Letters From Scotland
Anonymous – The Curse
Anonymous – Life In Death
N. P. Willis – My Hobby, —- Rather
Catherine Gore – The Red Man
Charles Lever – Post-Mortem Recollections Of A Medical Lecturer
Letitia E. Landon – The Bride Of Lindorf
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu – Passage In The Secret History Of An Irish Countess

Appendix A: Preliminaries for The Vampyre
Appendix B: Note On The Vampyre
Appendix C: Lord Byron, by Augustus Darvell
Bibliographical Notes
Explanatory Notes

Posted in *Oxford*, Chris Baldick, Robert Morrison | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Dorothy L. Sayers – Great Short Stories of Detection, Mystery & Horror

Posted by demonik on October 18, 2009

Dorothy L. Sayers – Great Short Stories of Detection, Mystery & Horror (Gollancz, September 1928)

dorothylsayersmystdetection

Margaret Oliphant – The Open Door
Charles Dickens – Story of the Bagman’s Uncle
Charles Collins & Charles Dickens- The Trial for Murder
M. R. James – Martin’s Close
Oliver Onions – Phantas
Robert Hichens – How Love Came to Professor Guildea
Saki – The Open Window
Arthur Machen – The Black Seal
Sax Rohmer – Tcheriapin
W. W. Jacobs – The Monkey’s Paw
A. J. Alan – The Hair
E. F. Benson – Mrs. Amworth
Ambrose Bierce – Moxon’s Master
Jerome J. Jerome – The Dancing Partner
Robert Louis Stevenson – Thrawn Janet
R. H. Benson – Father Meuron’s Tale
Marjorie Bowen – The Avenging of Ann Leete
J. F. Sullivan –  The Man With A Malady
William Fryer Harvey – August Heat
Morley Roberts – The Anticipator
Joseph Conrad – The Brute
May Sinclair – Where Their Fire Is Not Quenched
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu – Green Tea
J. D. Beresford – The Misanthrope
John Metcalfe – The Bad Lands
Alfred M. Burrage – Nobody’s House
Arthur Quiller-Couch – The Seventh Man
N. Royde-Smith – Proof
Walter de la Mare – Seaton’s Aunt
Michael Arlen – The Gentleman From America
R. Ellis Roberts – The Narrow Way
Traditional – Sawney Beane
Bram Stoker – The Squaw
Violet Hunt – The Corsican Sisters
Barry Pain – The End of A Show
H. G. Wells – The Cone
Ethel Colburn Mayne – The Separate Room

The first of three epic volumes in this classic series; stories listed are the Mystery & Horror content only.  Series II and III to follow ASAP

Posted in *Gollancz*, Dorothy L. Sayers | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Great Ghost Stories

Posted by demonik on April 22, 2009

R. Chetwynd-Hayes and Stephen Jones (eds.) – Great Ghost Stories (Cemetery Dance, Carroll & Graf, 2004)

[image]

Les Edwards

Foreword – Stephen Jones
Introduction – R. Chetwynd-Hayes

Amelia B. Edwards – The Four-Fifteen Express
Richard Middleton – On the Brighton Road
Ambrose Bierce – The Moonlit Road
G. B. S.- The Whittaker’s Ghost
S. Baring-Gould – The Leaden Ring
Sir Walter Scott – The Tapestried Chamber
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu – Ghost Stories Of The Tiled House
F. Marion Crawford – The Dead Smile
Daniel Defoe – The Ghost of Dorothy Dingley
Anon – The Dead Man Of Varley Grange
E. Nesbit – John Charrington’s Wedding
Sydney J. Bounds – The Night Walkers
Amyas Northcote – Brickett Bottom
John Kendrick Bangs – The Water Ghost of Harrowby Hall
Stephen King – The Reaper’s Image
Jerome K. Jerome – Christmas Eve in the Blue Chamber
Steve Rasnic Tem – Housewarming
Ramsey Campbell – The Ferries
Tina Rath – The Fetch
Washington Irving – Guests From Gibbet Island
Garry Kilworth – The Tryst
Guy de Maupassant – An Apparition
Brian Lumley – Aunt Hester
Tony Richards – Our Lady Of The Shadows
R. Chetwynd-Hayes – She Walks on Dry Land

Can anyone see the sense in this? Take a series of everyman pocket paperbacks like The Fontana Book Of Great Ghost Stories, which, in their day were available in just about every newsagent and supermarket up and down the country, and like as not got several people on here reading the stuff. Make a random selection from volumes 17-20. Get Les Edwards to design you a terrific cover, fully in sympathy with the original series. Now, have the thing printed, making sure it’s as unnecessarily bulky as possible, and run off just enough copies so that it sells out prior to publication. Appealing to the “I’ve still got my factory sealed, never been opened, worth a bomb!” non-reading market is all very well, but it’s also driving another stake into the heart of what’s supposed to be ‘popular fiction’. Hope they won an award for it.

Anyway, here’s the Blurb:

Eerie atmospherics, a sense of foreboding, then the unease, a chill, a shudder, ghosts, terror — again and again, in the twenty-five superbly scary tales of this standout anthology, they’re conjured artfully, both by modern masters of the macabre, among them Stephen King, Garry Kilworth, Brian Lumley, Ramsey Campbell, and Tony Richards, and by literary greats like Ambrose Bierce, Washington Irving, Sir Water Scott, and J Sheridan Le Fanu. Culled from the renowned Fontana Book of Great Ghost Stories series, which was edited from 1972 to 1984 by horror fiction writer and erudite anthologist R Chetwynd-Hayes, these highly original, and often long-obscure tales reflect the enduring fascination in our literary tradition with phantoms, specters, ghouls, and wraiths. There’s a fetch (i.e., doppelganger) too — in Tina Rath’s nasty take on a violent husband, his shrinking wife, and a scheming woman. And behind Guy de Maupassant’s simply titled “An Apparition” lurks a tale that Chetwynd-Hayes places among the top ten most terrifying ghost stories ever written. From Daniel Defoe’s engaging period piece, “The Ghost of Dorothy Dingley,” set in 1665, to the subtle slice of contemporary ghostly life in Stephen King’s “The Reaper’s Image,” dread takes many fearsome guises in the three centuries of chilling fiction collected here, and solace lies only at the feet of a very dark angel.

Posted in R. Chetwynd-Hayes, Stephen Jones | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Peter Haining – The Vampire Hunters Casebook

Posted by demonik on September 9, 2007

Peter Haining (ed.) – The Vampire Hunters’ Casebook (Warners, 1996)

Introduction-Peter Haining
Preface: Bram Stoker (extract from “Dracula”)

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu – Carmilla [extract]
Arabella Kennealy – The Beautiful Vampire
Alice and Claude Askew – Aylmer Vance and the Vampire
Uel Key -The Broken Fang
Seabury Quinn -The Man Who Cast No Shadow
Sydney Horler – The Vampire [extract]
Manly Wade Wellman – The Last Grave of Lili Warren
Peter Haining – The Beefsteak Room
Jeff Rice – The Night Stalker [extract]
Karl Edward Wagner – Beyond Any Measure
Robert Bloch – The Undead
Anne Rice – The Master of Rampling Gate
David J. Schow – A Week in the Unlife
Peter Tremayne – My Name Upon the Wind

Blurb

The Vampire Hunter is one of the most most courageous figures to stalk horror fiction’s bloody pages. Venturing into the world of the Undead armed only with a crucifix, wooden stake, garlic and a bottle of holy water, he dares the impossible – to end the existence of those already dead. And while Count Dracula is assured his place as the father of all vampires, so his nemesis in Bram Stoker’s seminal creation, Professor Abraham Van Helsing has his own immortality guaranteed within the pantheon of honor.

From its first incarnation in nineteenth-century melodrama to the works of more recent masters of the supernatural, such as Anne Rice and Robert Bloch, Peter Haining’s new anthology of short stories traces the fictional history of the Vampire’s greatest foe. Including the vampire hunter’s earliest appearance in Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s ‘Carmilla’ – with one of the most gruesome scenes in all of vampire literature – Van Helsing’s shadow casts an unmistakable presence over a diverse range of authors.

Prefaced by an extract from Dracula guiding the uninitiated into the vampire hunter’s arts, the good doctor from Amsterdam is resurrected in three stories: Robert Bloch’s ‘The Undead’, Peter Haining’s own ‘The Beefsteak Room’ and Peter Tremayne’s finale, ‘My Name Upon The Wind’ (written especially for the anthology), a truly chilling tale in which Van Helsing  is transplanted to present-day Ireland.

Staking a persuasive claim for these unsung heroes of the night, THE VAMPIRE HUNTERS’ CASEBOOK is a collection to fire the imagination and curdle the blood; but one word of warning – only in daylight should it be opened

Posted in *Warners*, Peter Haining, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »