Vault Of Evil

British Horror fiction

  • Pages

  • Vault on WordPress

    Plenty of Previous ...

    link to New English Library

    creepingevil

    link to Fontana

    link to Morbid Mayflowers

    link to Pan horrors

    link to Panther Horror

    link to Sordid Sphere

    link to terribletandems

    link to Terror Takeaways

    link to Gruesome Cargoes

    link to Gregory Pendennis Library Of Black Sorcery

  • Subscribe

  • Vintage Horror Anthologies

  • Publishers/ editors

  • Top Posts



  • Them as does evil have been …..

  • Meta

Posts Tagged ‘Ghosts & Scholars’

Rosemary Pardoe – The Black Pilgrimage & Other Explorations

Posted by demonik on June 5, 2018

Rosemary Pardoe – The Black Pilgrimage & Other Explorations: Essays On Supernatural Fiction (Shadow Publishing, May 31 2018)

Cover montage: Rosemary Pardoe

David A. Sutton – Introduction: A Fanzine Life

M. R. James And His Stories:

The Black Pilgrimage (with Jane Nicholls)
Who was Count Magnus? Notes towards an identification
James Wilson’s Secret (with Jane Nicholls)
Hostanes Magus
Two Magicians: Wilsthorpe and Aswarby (with Darroll Pardoe)
‘I’ve see it’: ‘A School Story’ and the House in Berkeley Square
The Night Raven
‘A Wonderful Book’: George MacDonald and ‘The Ash Tree’
Hercules and the Painted Cloth
The Demon in the Cathedral: A Jamesian Hoax
The Herefordshire of ‘A View from a Hill’ (with Darroll Pardoe)
How did Mr. Baxter find his Roman Villa
The Manuscript of ‘A Warning to the Curious’
The Three Fortunate Concealments
‘The Heathens and their Sacrifices: The God(s) of ‘An Evening Entertainment’
‘The Old Man on the Hill: Beelzebub in ‘An Evening’s Entertainment’
‘I seen it wive at me out of the winder’: The Window as Threshold in M. R. James’s Stories
‘Fluttering Draperies’: The Fabric of M. R. James
Scrying and the Horse-demon
The Date of ‘Merfield Hall/ House’
Adventures of a Jamesian Detective
The Man in King William Street
M. R. James and Arthur Machen
M. R. James and the ‘native of Winsconsin’
Introduction to Eton and Kings (with Darroll Pardoe)
Introduction to The Five Jars
Afterword to Two Ghost Stories: A Centenary
‘Strange Pastures’: Introduction to Occult Sciences
Introduction to Tales from Lectoure

Other Authors:

Walter Map’s De Nugis Curialium
Arthur Gray
E. G. Swain
A. P. Baker and A College Mystery
Fritz Leiber’s Our Lady of Darkness: A Jamesian Classic
Fritz Leiber’s ‘The Button Molder: A Jamesian story?’
Fritz Leiber’s ‘A Bit of the Dark World’
Manly Wade Wellman’s ‘Chorazin’

An Everlasting Club Miscellany:

Remembrances of Early Fandom and Old Fanzines
Early Reading: Dogs, Cats and Hobby Horses
Phil Rickman and Gwendolen McBride
The Real Thing: Garner, Lindholm, Brust and Pratchett
Paul Cornell’s ‘Shadow Police’
Jack Finney and the Disappearance of Rudolph Fentz
Wraiths don’t show up on CCTV (except when they do)
Creatures which frequent the roads and byways of America
The Magic of Maps

Frequently mentioned works
An Index to Story and Novel Titles

Blurb:
THE GHOSTLY WORK OF M.R. JAMES

The celebrated writer M.R. James (1862-1936) is arguably the most significant author of ghost stories in the world. His macabre work has terrified and fascinated readers for over a hundred years. Now collected in one volume, here are twenty-nine essays on his ghostly tales and themes by editor and James scholar Rosemary Pardoe.

Plus eight further essays on other authors, including Fritz Leiber, E.G. Swain and Manly Wade Wellman, and a fascinating miscellany of nine additional pieces on a variety of topics.

Rosemary Pardoe is a respected essayist and has edited the influential M.R. James-related magazine Ghosts & Scholars since 1979. She also edited three volumes of The Ghosts & Scholars Book of Shadows (Sarob Press), and is the co-editor of Ghosts and Scholars: Stories in the Tradition of M.R. James (with Richard Dalby, 1987) and Warnings to the Curious: A Sheaf of Criticism on M.R. James (with S.T. Joshi, 2007).

Posted in David Sutton, Rosemary Pardoe | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Mark Valentine – The Black Veil

Posted by demonik on August 25, 2008

Mark Valentine (ed.) – The Black Veil And Other Tales of Supernatural Sleuths (Wordsworth Mystery & the Supernatural, July 2008)

valentineblackveil

 

Introduction – Mark Valentine

Robert Eustace & L.T. Meade – The Warder of the Door
E. & H. Heron – The Story of Sevens Hall
William Hope Hodgson – The Gateway of the Monster
Arthur Machen – The Red Hand
Allen Upward – The Haunted Woman
Robert Barr – The Ghost with the Club-foot
Vernon Knowles – The Curious Activities of Basil Thorpenden
Donald Campbell – The Necromancer
L. Adams Beck – Waste Manor
John Cooling – The House of Fenris
Mark Valentine – The Prince of Barlocco
Colin P. Langeveld – The Legacy of the Viper
Mary Anne Allen (Rosemary Pardoe) – The Sheelagh-na-gig
A.F. Kidd – The Black Veil
R.B. Russell – Like Clockwork
Rosalie Parker – Spirit Solutions

The Gateway of the Monster… The Red Hand… The Ghost Hunter

To Sherlock Holmes the supernatural was a closed book: but other great detectives have always been ready to do battle with the dark instead. This volume brings together sixteen chilling cases of these supernatural sleuths, pitting themselves against the peril of ultimate evil. Here are encounters from the casebooks of the Victorian haunted house investigators John Bell and Flaxman Low, from Carnacki, the Edwardian battler against the abyss, and from horror master Arthur Machen’s Mr Dyson, a man-about-town and meddler in strange things. Connoisseurs will find rare cases such as those of Allen Upward’s The Ghost Hunter, Robert Barr’s Eugene Valmont (who may have inspired Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot) and Donald Campbell’s young explorer Leslie Vane, the James Bond of the jazz age, who battles against occult enemies of the British Empire. And the collection is completed by some of the best tales from the pens of modern psychic sleuth authors.

Thanks to Alan Frackelton for providing the contents of both this and The Wolf Pack!

Posted in *Wordsworth" | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »