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Posts Tagged ‘F. G. Loring’

Michael Sims – Dracula’s Guest

Posted by demonik on September 13, 2011

Michael Sims (ed.) – Dracula’s Guest: A Connoisseur’s Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories (Bloomsbury, 2010)

Victoria Sawdon

Cover illustration: Victoria Sawdon

Michael Sims – Introduction: The Cost Of Living

Part One: The Roots

Jean-Baptise de Moyer, Marquis d’Argens – They Opened The Graves
Antoine Augustin Calmet – Dead Persons In Hungary
George Gordon, Lord Byron – The End Of My Journey
John Polidori – The Vampyre
Johann Ludwig Tieck (attributed [almost certainly wrongly]) – Wake Not The Dead
Theophile Gautier – The Deathly Lover

Part Two: The Tree

Aleksei Tolstoy – The Family Of The Vourdalak
James Malcolm Rymer – Varney The Vampyre (extract)
Fitz-James O’Brien – What Was It?
Anonymous – The Mysterious Stranger
Anne Crawford – A Mystery of the Campagna
Emily Gerard – Death And Burial – Vampires And Werewolves
Mary Cholmondeley – Let Loose
Eric Count Stenbock – A True Story of a Vampire
M. E. Braddon – Good Lady Ducayne
Augustus Hare – And The Creature Came In
F. G. Loring – The Tomb of Sarah
Hume Nisbet – The Vampire Maid

Part Three: The Fruit

Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman – Luella Miller
M. R. James – Count Magnus
Alice and Claude Askew – Aylmer Vance and the Vampire
Bram Stoker – Dracula’s Guest

Acknowledgements
Bibliography & Further Reading

From the Blurb
Before Twilight and True Blood, vampires haunted the nineteenth century, when brilliant writers everywhere indulged their bloodthirsty imaginations, culminating in Bram Stoker’s legendary 1897 novel, Dracula.

Acclaimed author and anthologist Michael Sims brings together the finest vampire stories of the Victorian era in a unique collection that highlights their cultural variety. Beginning with the supposedly true accounts that captivated Byron and Shelley, the stories range from Aleksei Tolstoy’s tale of a vampire family to Fitz-James O’Brien’s invisible monster to Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s sinister widow Good Lady Ducayne. Sims also includes a nineteenth-century travel tour of Transylvanian superstitions, and rounds out the collection with Stoker’s own Dracula’s Guest – a chapter omitted from his landmark novel.

Posted in *Bloomsbury*, Michael Sims, Young Adult | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

James Dickie – The Undead

Posted by demonik on September 1, 2007

James Dickie (ed.) – The Undead: Vampire Masterpieces (Neville Spearman, 1971: Pan 1973)

Richard Wilbur – The Undead (verse)
Introduction – James Dickie

Bram Stoker – Dracula’s Guest
F. Marion Crawford – For The Blood Is The Life
Clark Ashton Smith – The End Of The Story
Clark Ashton Smith – The Death Of Ilalotha
F. G. Loring – The Tomb Of Sarah
Carl Jacobi – Revelations In Black
E. F. Benson – The Room In The Tower
Ambrose Bierce – The Death Of Halpin Frayser
Eric, Count Stenbock – A True Story Of A Vampire
H. P. Lovecraft – The Hound
Manly Wade Wellman – When It Was Moonlight
Everil Worrell – The Canal
Walter Starkie – The Old Man’s Story

Blurb: (Pan edition)
`Most mysterious and intriguing of all occult phenomena, the vampire becomes in death the expression of sadistic erotomania at its intensest.’

A unique anthology to chill through flesh and blood and bone based on established lore of the vampire tradition in all its hideous detail.
The fascinating foreword by James Dickie introduces thirteen stories by such masters of the macabre as Bram Stoker, Ambrose Bierce, H. P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith.
For your peace of mind, now decide where fact and fantasy merge in these tales of vampires and victims who make up the bloody legions of the undead .. .

Posted in *Neville Spearman*, *Pan*, James Dickie | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »