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Posts Tagged ‘David Kendall’

David Kendall – Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics

Posted by demonik on November 12, 2008

David Kendall (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics (Robinson, 2008)


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Cover image: Carlos Kastro
Cover design: Pete Rozycki

Blurb:

The Undead are heading your way – 18 of the greatest zombie comics ever.

You can’t keep a good (or bad) corpse down, and they rise up in spectacular form in this new collection. These days zombies are the rock and roll of horror monsters.

Presenting a mix of voodoo victims, creepy somnambulists, and flesh eating deadheads, This collection brings you the best the graveyard can yield up, including:

Vince Locke’s first ever Deadworld comic, Black Sabbath, in which a little window-shopping turns out to be a big mistake.

Scott Hampton’s awesome adaptation of R. E. Howard’s slice of Southern Gothic, Pigeons From Hell.

Darko Macan’s short E.C.-style shocker The Immortals.

Askold Akishin’s The Haunted Ship, in which shipwreck survivors discover an apparently abandoned vessel.

Steve Niles’ modern twist on the traditional back-for-revenge story, Making Amends.

If it’s dead, moving and hungry, you’ll find it here!

“The mindless, shambling zombies of yesteryear are rapidly being replaced by sprinters and runners with an insatiable appetite for human flesh …. “

Unlike the other Mammoths mentioned in this section, … Zombies doesn’t delve back into pre-code days – presumably any pre-nineteen eighties zombies are now far too mouldy to resurrect! I’ve not had time to study everything at length, but as there’s been much response to the recent Robert E. Howard threads, Pigeons From Hell seemed as good a place as any to dip in, a very dark, claustrophobic strip with no dialogue whatsoever. Artist Scott Hampton remains faithful to REH’s original throughout, but perhaps it helps if you know the story or you might struggle to make sense of what’s going on. It’s early days yet, but so far I’ve been most taken with Buddy Scalara’s epic, Necrotic: Dead Flesh On A Living Body from 2001 which answers that big question i’m sure we’ve all put to ourselves at one time or another: can the walking dead still enjoy a love life and if so, what happens when they get …. carried away?

Posted in "Constable-Robinson*, Comics & Graphic Novels | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

forthcoming publications from Constable-Robinson

Posted by demonik on June 18, 2008

Exciting forcoming publications from Constable-Robinson include a posthumous Peter Haining collection on …. what else? True Hauntings!

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Trisha Telep (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Vampire Romance (July, 2008)

Paranormal romance is a supernatural force to be reckoned with. Although packed with a menagerie of werewolves, shapeshifters and assorted demons, its undisputed king is none other than our favourite centuries-old bloodsucker – the vampire.

We’re now living in a post-Buffy world of dark urban fantasy à la Laurell K. Hamilton’s Anita Blake, Sherrilyn Kenyon’s irresistible Dark Hunters and the blood-lusting soul mates of Christine Feehan.

But it doesn’t stop there. This Mammoth collection opens a vein to reveal the mind-boggling scope of the supercharged phenomenon created when vampires met romance.

Let the biggest and brightest names in the paranormal romance business take you hot on the haemoglobin trail of the sexiest creatures of the night. Witness the bewildering array of complex vampire codes of conduct, dark ritual and dating practices, as they chat up the locals and engage in the most erotic encounters you will sink your teeth into this side of un-Death. These ain’t your mother’s vampires!.

Peter Haining (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings (October, 2008)

This giant collection includes a huge range of 20th-century first-hand accounts of hauntings, such as the American troops who repeatedly saw the ghosts of a dead platoon of men while on patrol in Vietnam; and the witnessed haunting of a house near Tintagel in Cornwall that led actress Kate Winslet to pull out of buying the property.

It covers the full spectrum of credible hauntings, from poltergeists (the noisy, dangerous and frightening spirits that are usually associated with pubescent girls, like the Bell Witch), to phantoms (like the Afrits of Saudi Arabia) and seduction spirits (such as the Lorelei, which have lured German men to death).

Also included are the notes of the most famous ghost hunters of the twentieth century such as Hans Holzer, Susy Smith (USA); Harry Price, Jenny Randles (UK); Joyce Zwarycz (Australia), Eric Rosenthal (South Africa), and Hwee Tan (Japan).

Plus essays by such names as Robert Graves, Edgar Cayce, and M. R. James outlining their own – often extraordinary – conclusions as to just what ghosts might be; along with a full bibliography and list of useful resources.

[image] Mammoth Best New Horror 19

David Kendall (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics (October, 2008)

You can’t keep a good (or bad) corpse down, and they rise up in spectacular form in this new collection.

The mindless, shambling zombies of yesteryear are rapidly being replaced by sprinters and runners with an insatiable appetite for human flesh. These days zombies are the rock and roll of horror monsters.

Presenting a mix of voodoo victims, creepy somnambulists, and flesh eating, rock n roll deadheads, The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics brings you the best the graveyard can give. From film sources and literary sources to some very strange sources, here over 20 of the best zombie comics ever produced.

They include the first Vince Locke Deadworld comic, Scott Hampton’s awesome adaptation of RE Howard’s Pigeons From Hell, plus stories from Steve Niles, Darko Macan, and many, many more.

If it’s dead, moving and hungry, you’ll find it here!

Currently Available


Jon Lewis – The Mammoth Book of Boys Own Stuff
Maxim Jakubowski – The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper
Peter Normanton – The Mammoth Book of Best Horror Comics
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of Modern Ghost Stories
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of Haunted House Stories
Arthur Veno – The Mammoth Book of Bikers
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 18
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 17
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 16
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 15
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Monsters

How to spot a Robinson’s Mammoth

1. It will have the word ‘Mammoth’ included in the title.

Robinson Logo

Fig. A

2. There will be a ‘Robinsons’ logo on the spine (see Fig. A).

A randomly selected ‘Mammoth’ cover to further assist you in identifying one.

erotica600

Thanks to Sam at Constable-Robinson!

Posted in *Constable/Robinson* | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »