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British Horror fiction

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Posts Tagged ‘Comics’

Paperback Fanatic # 27: ‘Comics into paperbacks’ special

Posted by demonik on October 1, 2013

Justin Marriott (ed) – Paperback Fanatic # 27: ‘Comics into paperbacks’ special   (October, 2013)

paperbackfanatic27

A Tale of Two Cities

The fanatic reflects on a month of book-buying in the US of A.

Cryptzoological top 10
Nick Pope’s top ten of alien animals

Artists assemble!
The greatest team-up of all – comics artists and paperback covers! Jack Davis, FranK Frazettai, Catherine Jeffrey Jones, Boris Vallejo, Bill Ward & Co.

Russo of the living dead

John Russo’s horror paperbacks
The American Biggles

Graham Andrews on the tie-in novel to DC comic’s Blackhawk
From The Files of Ms Tree

Rob Matthews on the PI of paperbacks and comics
The Pulp Jungle

James Doig & Graeme Flanagan on another forgotten Australian pulp author – Gene Janes
Fantastic Fridays

The comics artists used by Ted White in his SF mags.
Who you gonna call?

Comic historian Ron Goulart and his many prose adaptations of comics characters
Mondo Bilbrew

Gene Bilbrew the comics artist that pursued a career in sleaze
Labyrinth

A look at shared pseudonyms at Belmont Tower
Blade Runner

Nigel Taylor on the movie tie-in that never was

Weird Heroes

The ground-breaking vision of Byron Preiss and his pulp anthology

Fanatical Mails
Response to issue 26: Nigel Taylor, Jim Walker, Bill Halvorsan, Joe Kenny, Stephen Sennitt, Charles Wing, Sandy Robertson, Alex Wurm, Paul Fearn, Graham Andrews, Andy Boot., Andrew Kersten.

Assistant editor: Jim O’Brien
Subscriptions, contact details from the Paperback Fanatic Megastore

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Peter Normanton – Mammoth Best Horror Comics

Posted by demonik on June 19, 2008

Peter Normanton (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Best Horror Comics (Robinson, 2008)

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That line-up in full!

Peter Normanton – Foreword

1. The Dark Age Of Comics: 1940’s – 1950’s

Famous Tales Of Terror (Yellowjacket #1, Sept. 1944)
Hitler’s Head (Weird Terror #1, Sept. 1952)
No Rest For The Dead (Journey Into Fear #12, March 1953)
He (Black Cat Mystery, Aug. 1952)
The Secret Files Of Dr. Drew (Rangers Comics #49, Oct. 1949)
The Corpse That Wouldn’t Die! (Web Of Evil #2, Jan. 1952)
Bride Of Death (Adventures Into Darkness #7, May 1952)
Dungeon Of Doom (Chamber Of Chills #6, March 1952)
Terror Of The Stolen Legs (Dark Mysteries #18, June 1954)
Den Of Horror (Weird Terror #3, Jan. 1953)
The Living Dead (Dark Mysteries #20, Oct. 1954)
Marching Zombies (Black Cat Mystery #35, May 1952)
Grave Rehearsal (Strange Fantasy #7, Aug. 1953)
A Glimpse Of The Pit (Horrific #9, Jan. 1954)
The Horror Of The Walking Corpse (Dark Mysteries #16, Feb. 1954)
The Thing That Walked At Night (Ghost Comics #9, Winter 1953)
Partners In Blood (Journey Into Fear #6, May 1952)
Dead Man’s Revenge (Shocking Mystery Cases #50, Sept. 1952)
The Hand Of Glory (Chilling Tales #13, Dec. 1952)
The Man Who Would Be Fate (Hand Of Fate #21, Aug. 1954)

2. The Terror Returns: 1960’s – 1970’s

The Master Of Dread End (Ghost Stories #1, Sept. 1962)
Santa’s Claws (Web Of Horror #3, Apr. 1970)
The Game Keeper (Ghostly Haunts #40, Sept. 1974)
Fatal Scalpel (Weird Vol. 2. #1, Dec. 1966)
The Weirdest Character I’ve Ever Known! (Ghostly Haunts #38, May. 1974)
Now … Another Maniac! (Psycho #18, May. 1974)
Through A Glass Darkly (Ghostly Tales #113, Feb. 1975)
Ghosts Walk Among Us (Psycho #15, Nov. 1973)
Tradition Of The Wolf (Nightmare #23, Feb. 1975)
Sea Of Graves (Web Of Horror #2, Feb. 1970)

3. The Faithful Few: 1980’s – 1990’s

Killer Planet (Death Rattle Vol. 2, #1, Oct. 1985)
Over His Head (Twisted Tales #2, Apr. 1983)
Christmas Carol (Demon Dreams #1, Feb. 1984)
Mr. Monster: His World (Dark Horse Presents #14, Jan. 1988)
Home Ties (Twisted Tales #6, Jan. 1984)
One Of These Days (Deadworld #6, Dec. 1987)
The Dunwich Horror (The Haunter Of The Dark & Other Grotesque Visions, 1999)
Dream Snake (Robert E. Howard Mythmaker, 1999)
Purgation (The Confessor Demonicus-ex-Deo, 1999)

4. A New Millennium Of The Macabre: 21st Century

Dread End (From The Tomb #12, Feb. 2004)
The Festival (Bedlam #5, July 2004)
The Crawlspace (From The Tomb #18, Christmas 2005)
Immortal: A Vampire Tale (Black Boar Press, 2003)
There Was An Old Woman (Fleshrot Tales From The Dead #2, 2003)
Cal McDonald: A Letter From B.S. (Drawing On Your Nightmares #1, Oct. 2003)
Luna’s Story: Little Red Riding Hood (Nightmares & Fairy Tales #8, March 2004)
The Graveswellers (Morbid #2, Feb. 2005)
Shuteye (Zacherley’s Midnight Terrors #2, 2004)

Acknowledgements.

Blurb:

In over 500 pages this book collects the finest tales of terror from the past sixty years of comic book publishing. It encompasses all eras of the genre, from the ‘weird menace’ horror of the perennially popular 1950s pre-Code comics published by EC, to the dark modern gems of the 90s and 2000s.

Discover the tales that drove the American youth of the 1950s into a frenzy and resulted in legislation to put an end to their gruesome content – the pre-Code comic book macabre that was Dark Mysteries, Chamber of Chills, Weird Terror and Journey into Fear. Contributors from these early years include Bernie Wrightson, master adapter of Lovecraft, Mary Shelley and Stephen King; Mike Kaluta, the man behind The Shadow, Metropolis, and The Spawn of Frankenstein; and Rudy Palais, the EC artist responsible for such twisted works as Marching Zombies.

Modern contributions include Pete Von Scholly’s The Graveswellers (the man behind The Shawshank Redemption, The Mask, and The Green Mile), David Hitchcock’s self-published Immortal – a Vampire Tale (creator of the Jack the Ripper comic Whitechapel Freak), Thomas Ott’s G.O.D. from Greetings from Hellville (acclaimed Swiss noir artist), Legendary Canadian counter-culture cartoonist Rand Holmes’ Death Rattle, and Vincent Locke’s One of These Days (famed for his underground hit zombie comic Deadworld), and comic-book legend Steve Ditko’s Disaster Doom Death

Not had a chance to give this anything more than a cursory browse yet, but it looks terrific! The second strip, from Weird Terror (Sept 1952) for example, is a delightful little thing entitled Hitler’s Head and who could resist The Terror Of The Stolen Legs? Review to follow ASAP but, in the meantime, has anyone else had the pleasure?

Posted in "Constable-Robinson*, Comics & Graphic Novels | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Paul Gravett – Mammoth Best Crime Comics

Posted by demonik on June 18, 2008

Paul Gravett (ed.) The Mammoth Book of Best Crime Comics (Robinsons, 2008)

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Cover design by Peter Stanbury: Illustration by Jordi Bernet

Here is the first ever popular collection of crime comics – the 24 best graphic short stories in the crime genre, spanning all the colours of noir, from classic American newspaper strip serials and notorious uncensored comic books to today’s global graphic novel masterpieces.

This must-have collection is fully loaded with some of the greatest writers and artists in comics publishing, including Frank Miller, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Will Eisner, Max Allan Collins, Johnny Craig, Alex Toth, Joe Kubert, Bernie Krigstein – plus adaptations of/collaborations by famous crime writers, such as Dashiel Hammett, Mickey Spillane, Lesley Charteris and Raymond Chandler.

Meet a gallery of hard-boiled, iconic heroes and killers inside including:Dashiell Hammett’s smooth operator Secret Agent X-9, Will Eisner’s masked mystery man The Spirit, Mickey Spillane’s heavyweight tough-guy Mike Hammer, Muñoz and Sampayo’s brooding ex-cop Alack Sinner, Abuli and Bernet’s venal hitman-for-hire Torpedo 1936, Max Allan Collins and Terry Beatty’s femme fatale investigator Ms. Tree, and Charles Burns’ Mexican wrestler and defective detective El Borbah.

About the Author:

Paul Gravett is the leading light in the UK comics industry. Freelance journalist, curator, and broadcaster, he has worked in comics publishing and promotion for over 20 years. He writes for publications as diverse as the Guardian, Bookseller and Comics International; and is author of Manga: 60 Years of Japanese Comics and Graphic Novels; Stories to Change Your Life.

Published by Robinson 18 July 2008, paperback, £12.99

I don’t do “bedside books” because I’m always far too busy having sex, but let’s pretend for a moment that I was like you poor fellows who lead a life of solitary vice and, most likely, wear pyjamas and comfy tartan slippers; then I’d have no hesitation in snuggling up in bed with a steaming hot cup of cocoa and a copy of The Mammoth Book of Best Crime Comics because it’s epic!

Only intended to flick through it for the time being but I wasn’t reckoning with the irresistible pull of Jack Cole’s drug soaked Murder, Morphine And Me (True Crimes, 1948), masked wrestler El Bordah (reluctantly dragging himself away from his copy of Bongo Butt magazine to investigate a bad show at the Sperm Bank in Charles Burns’ Love In Vein, 1987) and the squelchy horrors of Johnny Craig’s suitably malodorous The Sewer (William M. Gaines’ Crime Suspense Stories, 1951).

Ruthless Mr. Big’s, ultra-violent hoods, double-dealing dames, unscrupulous PI’s, cops of all stripe, stacked broads, the occasional juvenile delinquent – they’re all present and up to no good. I’ve not spotted any blackmailer’s or fat guys called ‘Mo’ yet, but chances are they’re in here. When I get time, I’ll try and give you the full table of contents for this and the companion volume of sorts – Mammoth Horror Comics – but hopefully this taster will at least give you some idea of the sickly treats in store.

Thanks, Sam!

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forthcoming publications from Constable-Robinson

Posted by demonik on June 18, 2008

Exciting forcoming publications from Constable-Robinson include a posthumous Peter Haining collection on …. what else? True Hauntings!

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Trisha Telep (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Vampire Romance (July, 2008)

Paranormal romance is a supernatural force to be reckoned with. Although packed with a menagerie of werewolves, shapeshifters and assorted demons, its undisputed king is none other than our favourite centuries-old bloodsucker – the vampire.

We’re now living in a post-Buffy world of dark urban fantasy à la Laurell K. Hamilton’s Anita Blake, Sherrilyn Kenyon’s irresistible Dark Hunters and the blood-lusting soul mates of Christine Feehan.

But it doesn’t stop there. This Mammoth collection opens a vein to reveal the mind-boggling scope of the supercharged phenomenon created when vampires met romance.

Let the biggest and brightest names in the paranormal romance business take you hot on the haemoglobin trail of the sexiest creatures of the night. Witness the bewildering array of complex vampire codes of conduct, dark ritual and dating practices, as they chat up the locals and engage in the most erotic encounters you will sink your teeth into this side of un-Death. These ain’t your mother’s vampires!.

Peter Haining (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings (October, 2008)

This giant collection includes a huge range of 20th-century first-hand accounts of hauntings, such as the American troops who repeatedly saw the ghosts of a dead platoon of men while on patrol in Vietnam; and the witnessed haunting of a house near Tintagel in Cornwall that led actress Kate Winslet to pull out of buying the property.

It covers the full spectrum of credible hauntings, from poltergeists (the noisy, dangerous and frightening spirits that are usually associated with pubescent girls, like the Bell Witch), to phantoms (like the Afrits of Saudi Arabia) and seduction spirits (such as the Lorelei, which have lured German men to death).

Also included are the notes of the most famous ghost hunters of the twentieth century such as Hans Holzer, Susy Smith (USA); Harry Price, Jenny Randles (UK); Joyce Zwarycz (Australia), Eric Rosenthal (South Africa), and Hwee Tan (Japan).

Plus essays by such names as Robert Graves, Edgar Cayce, and M. R. James outlining their own – often extraordinary – conclusions as to just what ghosts might be; along with a full bibliography and list of useful resources.

[image] Mammoth Best New Horror 19

David Kendall (ed.) – The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics (October, 2008)

You can’t keep a good (or bad) corpse down, and they rise up in spectacular form in this new collection.

The mindless, shambling zombies of yesteryear are rapidly being replaced by sprinters and runners with an insatiable appetite for human flesh. These days zombies are the rock and roll of horror monsters.

Presenting a mix of voodoo victims, creepy somnambulists, and flesh eating, rock n roll deadheads, The Mammoth Book of Zombie Comics brings you the best the graveyard can give. From film sources and literary sources to some very strange sources, here over 20 of the best zombie comics ever produced.

They include the first Vince Locke Deadworld comic, Scott Hampton’s awesome adaptation of RE Howard’s Pigeons From Hell, plus stories from Steve Niles, Darko Macan, and many, many more.

If it’s dead, moving and hungry, you’ll find it here!

Currently Available


Jon Lewis – The Mammoth Book of Boys Own Stuff
Maxim Jakubowski – The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper
Peter Normanton – The Mammoth Book of Best Horror Comics
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of Modern Ghost Stories
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings
Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of Haunted House Stories
Arthur Veno – The Mammoth Book of Bikers
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 18
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 17
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 16
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 15
Stephen Jones – The Mammoth Book of Monsters

How to spot a Robinson’s Mammoth

1. It will have the word ‘Mammoth’ included in the title.

Robinson Logo

Fig. A

2. There will be a ‘Robinsons’ logo on the spine (see Fig. A).

A randomly selected ‘Mammoth’ cover to further assist you in identifying one.

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Thanks to Sam at Constable-Robinson!

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