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Posts Tagged ‘Books’

Richard Dalby – Virago Book Of Ghost Stories 2006

Posted by demonik on April 11, 2009

Richard Dalby (ed.) – The Virago Book Of Ghost Stories (Virago, 2006)


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Cover illustration: Tina Mansuwan at CIA

Inside cover blurb:
Bringing together vintage tales from the outstandingly successful Virago anthologies The Virago Book of Ghost Storied (Volumes I and II) and Victorian Ghost Stories, comes this chilling new omnibus.
Lost loves, past enmities and unwanted memories mingle with the inexplicable as unquiet souls return to repay kindnesses, settle scores and haunt the imagination.
Featuring some of the finest writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, these stories gather to haunt and horrify — an irresistible read for those with a taste for being spooked.

Preface – Richard Dalby

Charlotte Bronte – Napoleon And The Spectre
Elizabeth Gaskell – The Old Nurse’s Story
Amelia B. Edwards – The Story Of Salome
Mrs Henry Wood – Reality Or Delusion?
Charlotte Riddell – The Old House In Vauxhall Walk
Margaret Oliphant – The Open Door
Ella D’Arcy – The Villa Lucienne
Mary E. Wilkins (Freeman) – The Vacant Lot
E. Nesbit – The Violet Car
Edith Wharton -The Eyes
May Sinclair – The Token
Richmal Crompton – Rosalind
Margery H. Lawrence – The Haunted Saucepan
Margaret Irwin – The Book
F. M. Mayor – Miss De Mannering Of Asham
Ann Bridge – The Station Road
Stella Gibbons – Roaring Tower
Elizabeth Bowen – The Happy Autumn Fields
Rosemary Timperley – The Mistress in Black
Celia Fremlin – Don’t Tell Cissie
Antonia Fraser – Who’s Been Sitting In My Car
Ruth Rendell – The Haunting Of Shawley Rectory
A. S. Byatt – The July Ghost
A. L. Barker – The Dream Of Fair Women
Penelope Lively – Black Dog
Rosemary Pardoe – The Chauffeur
Lisa St. Aubin De Teran – Diamond Jim
Angela Carter – Ashputtle
Elizabeth Fancett – The Ghost Of Calagou
Joan Aikin – The Traitor
Dorothy K. Haynes – Redundant

Notes on the authors

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‘Sapper’ – Bulldog Drummond

Posted by demonik on April 11, 2009

‘Sapper’ (Herman Cyril McNeille) – Bulldog Drummond: The Carl Peterson Quartet (Wordsworth Editions, 2007)

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Nesta Jennings Campbell, Shades Of Night

Blurb:

‘Demobilised officer, finding peace incredibly tedious would welcome diversion. Legitimate if possible; but crime, of a comparatively humorous description, no objection. Excitement essential.’

Bulldog Drummond was the original daredevil adventurer who, with his various friends, made it their mission to fight all enemies of Britain in the uncertain years following the First World War. Fearless, resourceful and debonair, Drummond could easily have been the father of James Bond. In the first four novels of the series, Bulldog Drummond, The Black Gang, The Third Round, The Final Count, all of which are contained within this volume, Hugh Drummond finds himself pitting his wits again Carl Peterson, a criminal genius with an insatiable passion for power and world domination. He has the great facility of disguise and his chameleon appearances are one of the joys of these thrilling tales. Peterson’s constant companion is the sinister but beautiful Irma.

The Drummond books are exciting page-turning adventures for grown up boys and girls.

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Stephen Jones – Best New Horror 6

Posted by demonik on April 11, 2009

Stephen Jones – Best New Horror 6 (Raven, 1995)

bestnewhorror6

Luis Rey

Stephen Jones – Introduction:  Horror in 1994

Lawrence Watt-Evans – Dead Babies
Harlan Ellison – Sensible City
Terry Lamsley – Blade and Bone
Norman Partridge – Harvest
Charles L. Grant – Sometimes, in the Rain
Richard Christian Matheson – Ménage à Trois
Joel Lane – Like Shattered Stone
Douglas E. Winter – Black Sun
M. John Harrison – Isobel Avens Returns to Stepney in the Spring
Ian R. MacLeod – The Dead Orchards
Elizabeth Massie – What Happened When Mosby Paulson Had Her Painting Reproduced on the Cover of the Phone Book
Ramsey Campbell – The Alternative
Karl Edward Wagner – In the Middle of a Snow Dream
Paul J. McAuley – The Temptation of Dr Stein
Garry Kilworth – Wayang Kulit
Robert Bloch – The Scent of Vinegar
Nicholas Royle – The Homecoming
Geoffrey A. Landis – The Singular Habits of Wasps
Michael Marshall Smith – To Receive Is Better
Brian Hodge – The Alchemy of the Throat
Kim Newman – Out of the Night, When the Full Moon is Bright…
Esther M. Friesner – Lovers

Stephen Jones & Kim Newman – Necrology 1994

Best New Horror 6 thread at Vault Of Evil

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Deborah Shine – Haunting Ghost Stories

Posted by demonik on April 2, 2009

Deborah Shine (ed.) – Haunting Ghost Stories: Illustrations by Reg Gray (Octopus, 1980)


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A spine-chilling collection of stories by the masters of horror and suspense.

Walter De La Mare – The Riddle
Stanley W. Fisher – The Sybarite
Roger F. Dunkley – Echoes In The Sand
Oliver Onions – The Mortal
Michelle Maurious – Fame
H. Brinsmead-Hungerford – Giovanni Paolo’s Land
H. G. Wells – The Red Room
Paul Dorrell – Lonely Boy
Colin Thiele – The Phantom Horses
Michael Joseph – The Yellow Cat
Stanley W. Fisher – A Little House Of Their Own
E. F. Benson – Expiation
John Gordon – Kroger’s Choice
Saki – Laura
Paul Dorrell – Tea And Empathy
M. R. James – The Haunted Doll’s House
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – The Brown Hand
W. W. Jacobs – The Well
Robert Arthur – The Haunted Trailer
Walter De La Mare – Bad Company
Lucy M. Boston – Many Coloured Glass
Ambrose Bierce – The Stranger
Edgar Allan Poe – The Tell-Tale Heart
H. R. Wakefield – The Gorge Of The Churels
E. Nesbit – Man-Size In Marble
Brian Alderson – The Wooing Of Cherry Basnett
Ambrose Bierce – A Tough Tussle
W. W. Jacobs – The Monkey’s Paw
Glenn Chandler – The Late Departure
H. R. Wakefield – Damp Sheets
Sorche Nic Leodhas – The Battle With The Bogles
Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch – A Pair Of Hands

Another anthology aimed at a young audience which can be enjoyed by all ages. Clung onto a copy of this for years, eventually got rid of it along with most of the young adult books i’d acquired, regretted it ever since. Found this copy in a cardboard box full of old plugs, a computer mouse and a moth-eaten dayglo pink fright wig (i was tempted but didn’t have the £3 to stump up) at the local flea market on Sunday for 50p! With all the books and mags flying around just now, it will probably be a while until i get around to a rematch, but with the likes of John Gordon, Lucy Boston and Robert Arthur fighting it out with acknowledged classics and welcome, less obvious selections from Wakefield and Benson you can hardly go wrong. Minus point for the unnecessary childish doodles repeated on the inside covers (would have been just the thing to put me off the book as a kid), ‘specially after they’d done so well with the skull photo, but otherwise a dead commendable collection!

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Michel Parry (ed.) – The Waves of Terror

Posted by demonik on November 12, 2008

Michel Parry  (ed.) – The Waves of Fear (Gollancz, 1976)

Michel Parry – Introduction

William Hope Hodgson – From the Tideless Sea
Eugene Burdick – Log the Man Dead
William Clark Russell – The Phantom Death
Guy de Maupassant – At Sea
Joseph Conrad – The Brute
Ambrose Bierce – A Psychological Shipwreck
David A. Drake – From the Dark Waters
Robert E. Howard – Sea Curse
Irvin S. Cobb – Fishhead
H. P. Lovecraft – Dagon
Captain William Outerson – Fire in the Galley Stove
John Russell – The Slayer
Robert Louis Stevenson – The Sinking Ship
William Hope Hodgson – More News from the Homebird
John Masfield – The Devil and the Old Man

Thanks to Lord Froggy of The British Fantasy Society for providing the contents!

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Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings

Posted by demonik on November 10, 2008

Peter Haining – The Mammoth Book of True Hauntings (Robinson, 2008)

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photo Tony O’Reilly/ Fortean Picture Library: Cover design: JoeRoberts.co.uk

Foreword: I Am A Researcher Of The Supernatural

A Century Of Hauntings: A Chronology from 1900-2000
The Ghost Hunters: Fifty Authentic Supernatural Experiences
Phantoms In The Sky: Ghostly Pilots, Aircraft And Haunted Airfields
Encounters With The Unknown: Eyewitness Stories By Journalists
Haunted Stars: Show Business And The Supernatural
Supernatural Tales: True Ghost Stories By Famous Authors
Phantom Lovers: Sexual Encounters With Ghosts
What Are Ghosts? The Theories Of The Experts
The A-Z Of Ghosts: Phantoms Of The World

Bibliography
Research Organisations
Acknowledgements

Back cover blurb:

Surprisingly, the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries have turned out to be the most extraordinary periods in the history of supernatural encounters – with more mysterious accounts of ghosts being reported from all over the world than during any previous era.

This giant survey from the acclaimed investigator, the late Peter Haining, years in the making and now posthumously published for the first time, documents the full spectrum of credible hauntings during the last hundred years or so. It encompasses over 100 first-hand accounts of poltergeists and phantoms, ghostly pilots and haunted airfields, seduction spirits and sexual encounters with ghostly entities – and much more. Also included are the notes of famous ghost hunters such as Hans Holzer, Harry Price, and Susy Smith; and some fascinating analysis by notable experts on what ghosts really are.

How appropriate that, as we approach November 19th and the first anniversary of his untimely death, the legendary Peter Haining should return from the grave with a collection of True Hauntings.

Experts will doubtless be mortified that Peter has exhumed several of these ‘true’ accounts from such reliable resources as The News Of The World and The Sunday People, but he’s also ransacked his library to good effect for accounts from (perhaps!) more credible authorities, several old Vault friends among them: Dennis Wheatley (on the true life incident at boarding school which inspired his big seller, The Haunting Of Toby Jugg), Arthur Machen (versus a Poltergeist infestation), Barbara Cartland, James Herbert, Robert Thurston Hopkins, Fred Archer, Elliott O’Donnell, Peter Underwood and medium to the stars Doris Stokes.

Predictably, the NOTW is the source for much of the Phantom Lovers: Sexual Encounters With Ghosts section which reads for the most part like a series of plot-outlines for Benny Hill sketches as the country’s struggling pubs are besieged by randy Royalists, Peeping Toms, Phantom Bottom-pinchers – the whole gamut of sex pests from beyond the grave. Typical of these “Grinning Ghouls”, the spectre in the changing room of The Disco Bar, Newcastle who so put the willies up go-go dancer Maggie in 1974, and an incorrigible old rascal who conducted his reign of terror in The Knights Lodge Inn near Corby during the ‘eighties. “I’ve seen him and he’s a big robust chap – a cavalier who carries an ostrich feather. He uses the feather to lift the ladies’ skirts and tickle them – he must have been a real Casanova when he was alive” deadpans a handy ‘Psychic Investigator’, Jean Cooksley. The vast majority of these encounters feature male spooks mithering Miss GB contestants and dolly birds, although The Sun (who else?) can provide a “scantily clad” (what else?) female phantom who steals the discarded clothing of courting couples should they frolic in her Hertfordshire field.

lynseydepaul

Spectre smitten, pop chanteuse Lynsey De Paul: Her Eurovision Song Contest hopes hit “Rock Bottom” in spooky circumstances!

As those of us who’ve been terrified out of our wits by The Weekend Book of Ghosts & Horror will know to our cost, saccharine-coated songstress Linsey de Paul is arguably the most haunted women in the history of pop and here we learn of another chilling episode in her troubled career – the case of the haunted headphones that so disrupted the fabled Rock Bottom sessions. Another haunted celebrity is William Shatner – and not just by his inspired incursion into the music world, The Transformed Man. Here he recalls his brush with death on a motorcycling tour where it could well have been all up for him had it not been for the intervention of a phantom biker.

I’ve only had the book a day and, doubtless, will have some more woeful comment to make as I progress, but it’s proving a most diverting read. One to file alongside his outrageous but scandalously entertaining ‘non-fiction’ accounts of The Legend & Bizarre Crimes of Spring-Heeled Jack and The Mystery & Horrible Murders of Sweeney Todd!

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Stephen Jones – Mammoth Best New Horror 19

Posted by demonik on October 9, 2008

Stephen Jones (ed.) – Mammoth Book Of Best New Horror #19 (Robinson, 2008)


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Carlos Kastro

Stephen Jones – Introduction: Horror in 2007

Michael Marshall Smith – The Things He Said
Simon Kurt Unsworth – The Church On The Island
Christopher Fowler – The Twilight Express
Ramsey Campbell – Peep
Tim Pratt – From Around Here
Gary McMahon – Pumpkin Night
Simon Strantzas – The Other Village
Mike O’Driscoll – 13 O’Clock
Joel Lane – Still Water
Joe Hill – Thumbprint
Nicholas Royle – Lancashire
Marc Lecard – The Admiral’s House
Tony Richards – Man, You Gotta See This!
David A. Sutton – The Fisherman
Reggie Oliver – The Children Of Monte Rosa
Neil Gaiman – The Witch’s Headstone
Joel Knight – Calico Black, Calico Blue
Steven Erikson – The Rich Evil Sound
Glen Hirshberg – Miss Ill-Kept Runt
Joe R. Lansdale – Deadman’s Road
Mark Samuels – A Gentleman From Mexico
Tom Piccirilli – Loss
Christopher Harman – Behind The Clouds: In Front Of The Sun
Caitlin R. Kiernan – The Ape’s Wife
Conrad Williams – Tight Wrappers
Kim Newman – Cold Snap

Stephen Jones & Kim Newman – Necrology: 2007

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Mark Valentine – The Black Veil

Posted by demonik on August 25, 2008

Mark Valentine (ed.) – The Black Veil And Other Tales of Supernatural Sleuths (Wordsworth Mystery & the Supernatural, July 2008)

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Introduction – Mark Valentine

Robert Eustace & L.T. Meade – The Warder of the Door
E. & H. Heron – The Story of Sevens Hall
William Hope Hodgson – The Gateway of the Monster
Arthur Machen – The Red Hand
Allen Upward – The Haunted Woman
Robert Barr – The Ghost with the Club-foot
Vernon Knowles – The Curious Activities of Basil Thorpenden
Donald Campbell – The Necromancer
L. Adams Beck – Waste Manor
John Cooling – The House of Fenris
Mark Valentine – The Prince of Barlocco
Colin P. Langeveld – The Legacy of the Viper
Mary Anne Allen (Rosemary Pardoe) – The Sheelagh-na-gig
A.F. Kidd – The Black Veil
R.B. Russell – Like Clockwork
Rosalie Parker – Spirit Solutions

The Gateway of the Monster… The Red Hand… The Ghost Hunter

To Sherlock Holmes the supernatural was a closed book: but other great detectives have always been ready to do battle with the dark instead. This volume brings together sixteen chilling cases of these supernatural sleuths, pitting themselves against the peril of ultimate evil. Here are encounters from the casebooks of the Victorian haunted house investigators John Bell and Flaxman Low, from Carnacki, the Edwardian battler against the abyss, and from horror master Arthur Machen’s Mr Dyson, a man-about-town and meddler in strange things. Connoisseurs will find rare cases such as those of Allen Upward’s The Ghost Hunter, Robert Barr’s Eugene Valmont (who may have inspired Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot) and Donald Campbell’s young explorer Leslie Vane, the James Bond of the jazz age, who battles against occult enemies of the British Empire. And the collection is completed by some of the best tales from the pens of modern psychic sleuth authors.

Thanks to Alan Frackelton for providing the contents of both this and The Wolf Pack!

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Mark Valentine – The Werewolf Pack

Posted by demonik on August 25, 2008

Mark Valentine (ed.) – The Werewolf Pack (Wordsworth Editions, June 2008)

valentinewerewolf

 

Introduction – Mark Valentine

Captain Frederick Marryat – The White Wolf of the Hartz Mountains
Sir Gilbert Campbell – The White Wolf of Kostopchin
Count Stenbock – The Other Side
B. Fletcher Robinson – The Terror in the Snow
Mrs Hugh Fraser – A Werewolf of the Campagna
Andrew Lang – The White Wolf
Andrew Lang – The Boy and the Wolf, or The Broken Promise
F.J. Harvey Darton – William and the Werewolf
Barry Pain – The Undying Thing
Saki – Gabriel-Ernest
Saki – The She-Wolf
Bernard Capes – The Thing in the Forest
Vasile Voiculescu – Among the Wolves
Ron Weighell – The Shadow of the Wolf
Steve Duffy – The Clay Party
Gail-Nina Anderson – The Tale Untold
R.B. Russell – Loup-garou

Blurb:

The wolf has always been a creature of legend and romance, while kings, sorcerers and outlaws have been proud to be called by the name of the wolf, it s no wonder, then, that tales of transformation between man and wolf are so powerful and persistent. This original collection offers some of the greatest, rarest and most unusual werewolf stories ever. From the forests of Transylvania to the ordered lawns of an English country estate, here are all the classic aspects of the tale. You will encounter shadows that lope under the moon, chilling howls, family curses, crimson feasts, the desperate chase and the deathly duel. But you will also find the werewolf in less expected guises as an adversary for Sherlock Holmes, as a myth of the Wild West, and as a figure restored to its origins in folk and fairy tales. With an informative introduction by Mark Valentine that follows the traces of the werewolf in literature, and its links to Dracula, Jekyll & Hyde, and The Hound of the Baskervilles, this superb collection will make you fear the full moon.

Another welcome addition to the Mystery & Supernatural series. Mark Valentine’s judicious selection is a neat mix of the classic, the downright obscure and the contemporary. This one will sit nicely against Brian J. Frost’s wonderful Book Of The Werewolf (Sphere, 1973)!

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Christopher Fowler – Old Devil Moon

Posted by demonik on August 18, 2008

Christopher Fowler – Old Devil Moon (Serpent’s Tail, 2007)


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Cover designed by Harriman Steel

Foreword: The Sinister Life

The Threads
The Lady Downstairs
The Luxury Of Harm
Cupped Hands
The Night Museum
Starless
Take It All Out, Put It All Back
The Twilight Express
Exclusion Zone
Identity Crisis
Red Torch
Turbo-Satan
The Uninvited
The Spider Kiss
Heredity
Let’s Have Some Fun
Forcibly Bewitched
All Packed
Old Friends
Unnatural Selection
Invulnerable
That’s Undertainment!

Afterword: Q & A with Christopher Fowler

Blurb:

A geologist trapped in a town without water is lured into a desperate escape plan. A boy plans a murder in an eerie funfair. A cop witnesses an inexplicable plague of madness. A teenager learns a deadly trick with his mobile phone. A woman unlocks a childhood secret with the aid of old comic books. A secret museum opens only at night… Old Devil Moon is Christopher Fowler’s tenth collection of uniquely disturbing short stories, and contains the blackest humour and the darkest fears, set in worlds we walk through each day but rarely see.

Includes:

The Threads: Holidaying in North Africa, obnoxious English tourists Alan and Verity Markham learn the hard way that you don’t steal an expensive tapestry from the local shopkeepers and then insult their Religion into the bargain. No sooner has he slipped the item under his coat than Markham endures the most appalling toothache. He’s a long way from Harley Street so there’s nothing else for it: he’ll have to put his trust in one of the street dentists who sit cross-legged in a row before their medieval surgical instruments and mounds of removed teeth …. Arguably, this is even more squirm inducing than the classic On Edge. Splendid choice of opener.

The Luxury Of Harm: The narrator persuades Simon, his old school friend and partner in mayhem, to attend a Horror Convention at Silburton, Somerset. This year’s theme is “Murderers On Page And Screen” and our man makes sure the conversation turns toward who in the room would make the most likely serial killer.

There’s a lovely pop culture moment in this one, too.

“And through the mist I gradually discerned a splendor figure, his head lolling slightly to one side, one arm lower than the other, like the skeleton in Aurora’s ‘Forgotten Prisoner’ model kit, or the one that features on my copy of The Seventh Pan Book Of Horror Stories.”

That reference to the Pan’s is apt: this would have suited one of the Van Thal’s just so.

Let’s Have Some Fun: Computer software designer Steve has seen his business plummet into terminal decline and now he’s slumming it as a temp at Penning-Karshall, the most boring firm in Christendom. Learning of his passion for online gambling, Gabriel, the despised office geek puts him on to Hot Targets a virtual paintball game which requires the player to tag a pair of top-heavy, bikini clad Essex Girls as they run giggling through a forest in real time. It takes him a while to crack it, but soon Steve is winning big. So big, in fact, that he’s invited to the Dockland’s launch of Hot Targets‘ ambitious new service …

Turbo-Satan: “Tower Hamlets, toilet of the world, arse-end of the universe … no money, no dope, no fags, no booze, nothing to do, nowhere to go, no-one who cared if he went missing for all eternity … I have absolutely nothing to look forward to … I hate my life …”

My first thoughts on reading this was “some bastard’s been reading my diary!”, but then I remembered I don’t keep one and besides, this is well written. It’s Fowler’s updating of the Deal with the Devil motif for the digital age with phony art student Mats discovering a hot-line to Satan on his mobile. At first, he makes a few sensible requests – “make the bus driver give me £10″, etc. – but blows it when he starts trying to be clever.

Red Torch: He finally plucks up the courage to approach the stunning, skimpily dressed blonde usherette at the Greenwich Granada during a James Bond double-bill and, to his astonishment, she immediately leads him straight into the office for a quickie. Only when the utterly joyless fuck is over does he realise that, outside the darkened theatre, she ain’t quite the looker he’s been fantasising over these past weeks and her “youthful” charms are more far-fetched than anything in You Only Live Twice

That’s Undertainment!: Mr Fowler has previous in the imaginary films department (Soho Black, Plague Of Terror, etc.) but he outdoes himself with this vitriolic state-of-the-industry address, although you may argue that there’s nothing very “imaginary” about these blockbusters at all, or at least, there won’t be very shortly. Jade Goody makes her big screen debut alongside Ray Winstone in Guy Ritchie’s latest mockerney gangland caper Who Are You Calling A Tosser? (a sequel to the surprise flop Did You Call My Pint A Poof?): Hugh Grant brings his bumbling ‘romantic’ presence to Antiques Roadshow – The 3-D Movie, and – they really should show this in Primary School – a child dobs in her heretic schoolteacher mom to Republican Senator Jude Law in the cautionary My Mom’s A Darwinist.

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