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Archive for the ‘Rosemary Pardoe’ Category

Rosemary Pardoe – The Black Pilgrimage & Other Explorations

Posted by demonik on June 5, 2018

Rosemary Pardoe – The Black Pilgrimage & Other Explorations: Essays On Supernatural Fiction (Shadow Publishing, May 31 2018)

Cover montage: Rosemary Pardoe

David A. Sutton – Introduction: A Fanzine Life

M. R. James And His Stories:

The Black Pilgrimage (with Jane Nicholls)
Who was Count Magnus? Notes towards an identification
James Wilson’s Secret (with Jane Nicholls)
Hostanes Magus
Two Magicians: Wilsthorpe and Aswarby (with Darroll Pardoe)
‘I’ve see it’: ‘A School Story’ and the House in Berkeley Square
The Night Raven
‘A Wonderful Book’: George MacDonald and ‘The Ash Tree’
Hercules and the Painted Cloth
The Demon in the Cathedral: A Jamesian Hoax
The Herefordshire of ‘A View from a Hill’ (with Darroll Pardoe)
How did Mr. Baxter find his Roman Villa
The Manuscript of ‘A Warning to the Curious’
The Three Fortunate Concealments
‘The Heathens and their Sacrifices: The God(s) of ‘An Evening Entertainment’
‘The Old Man on the Hill: Beelzebub in ‘An Evening’s Entertainment’
‘I seen it wive at me out of the winder’: The Window as Threshold in M. R. James’s Stories
‘Fluttering Draperies’: The Fabric of M. R. James
Scrying and the Horse-demon
The Date of ‘Merfield Hall/ House’
Adventures of a Jamesian Detective
The Man in King William Street
M. R. James and Arthur Machen
M. R. James and the ‘native of Winsconsin’
Introduction to Eton and Kings (with Darroll Pardoe)
Introduction to The Five Jars
Afterword to Two Ghost Stories: A Centenary
‘Strange Pastures’: Introduction to Occult Sciences
Introduction to Tales from Lectoure

Other Authors:

Walter Map’s De Nugis Curialium
Arthur Gray
E. G. Swain
A. P. Baker and A College Mystery
Fritz Leiber’s Our Lady of Darkness: A Jamesian Classic
Fritz Leiber’s ‘The Button Molder: A Jamesian story?’
Fritz Leiber’s ‘A Bit of the Dark World’
Manly Wade Wellman’s ‘Chorazin’

An Everlasting Club Miscellany:

Remembrances of Early Fandom and Old Fanzines
Early Reading: Dogs, Cats and Hobby Horses
Phil Rickman and Gwendolen McBride
The Real Thing: Garner, Lindholm, Brust and Pratchett
Paul Cornell’s ‘Shadow Police’
Jack Finney and the Disappearance of Rudolph Fentz
Wraiths don’t show up on CCTV (except when they do)
Creatures which frequent the roads and byways of America
The Magic of Maps

Frequently mentioned works
An Index to Story and Novel Titles

Blurb:
THE GHOSTLY WORK OF M.R. JAMES

The celebrated writer M.R. James (1862-1936) is arguably the most significant author of ghost stories in the world. His macabre work has terrified and fascinated readers for over a hundred years. Now collected in one volume, here are twenty-nine essays on his ghostly tales and themes by editor and James scholar Rosemary Pardoe.

Plus eight further essays on other authors, including Fritz Leiber, E.G. Swain and Manly Wade Wellman, and a fascinating miscellany of nine additional pieces on a variety of topics.

Rosemary Pardoe is a respected essayist and has edited the influential M.R. James-related magazine Ghosts & Scholars since 1979. She also edited three volumes of The Ghosts & Scholars Book of Shadows (Sarob Press), and is the co-editor of Ghosts and Scholars: Stories in the Tradition of M.R. James (with Richard Dalby, 1987) and Warnings to the Curious: A Sheaf of Criticism on M.R. James (with S.T. Joshi, 2007).

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Richard Dalby & Rosemary Pardoe – Ghosts and Scholars

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Richard Dalby & Rosemary Pardoe (eds.)Ghosts and Scholars: Ghost Stories In The Tradition Of M. R. James (Crucible, 1987: Equation, 1989)

Ghosts & Scholars


Foreword – Michael Cox
Introduction – Rosemary Pardoe & Richard Dalby
M. R. James – Ghosts-Treat Them Gently

Sabine Baring-Gould – On the Leads
‘B’ – The Stone Coffin
A.C. Benson – The Slype House
R. Hugh Benson – Father Macclesfield’s Tale
Cecil Binney – The Saint and the Vicar
Sir Andrew Caldecott – Christmas Reunion
Ramsey Campbell – This Time
Patrick Carleton – Dr Horder’s Room
Carter Dickson (John Dickson Carr) – Blind Man’s Hood
Frederick Cowles – The Strange Affair at Upton Strangewold
‘Ingulphus’ (Arthur Gray) – Brother John’s Bequest
Sheila Hodgson – ‘Come, Follow!’
M. R. James – Ghost Story Competition
Winifred Galbraith – ‘Here He Lies Where He Longed to Be’
Emma S. Duffin – The House-Party
A. F. Kidd – An Incident in the City
Shane Leslie – As In a Glass Dimly
R. H. Malden – Between Sunset and Moonrise
L. T. C. Rolt – New Corner
David G. Rowlands – Sins of the Fathers
Eleanor Scott – Celui-La
Arnold Smith – The Face in the Fresco
Dermot Chesson Spence – The Dean’s Bargain
Lewis Spence – The Horn of Vapula
Montague Summers – The Grimoire
E. G. Swain – The Eastern Window

Select Bibliography

An extension of one of Britain’s finest small press publications, this collection traces the influence of James upon his contemporaries and later authors, right through to present day masters like Ramsey Campbell. There’s little by way of gore and violence, nor are too many crabs known to rampage through these crypts and Cathedrals. What these stories have to offer is an undeniable shuddersome quality courtesy of the many mouldering revenants who show themselves to the usual array of hapless antiquarians.

See also the excellent Ghosts & Scholars archive

Perhaps of slightly lesser import, the Vault Of Evil G&S thread

Posted in *Crucible*, Richard Dalby, Rosemary Pardoe | Leave a Comment »