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Archive for July 6th, 2010

‘C.J. T.’ – THE BEST TERRIBLE TALES

Posted by demonik on July 6, 2010

‘C.J. T.’ (ed.)  – THE BEST TERRIBLE TALES. (Gibbings, London, 1891: Reeves, London, 1912)

Originally published by Gibbings of London in 1891 with the editor given as ‘CJT’, the Reeves editions of 1912 retitle each volume The Best Terrible Tales Of … and lack even this helpful attribution. None of the authors are credited, but i’ve tried to identify the most likely suspects. For the curious, Hugh Lamb exhumed The Mountain Of Spirits and The Golden Bracelet for Tales from A Gaslit Graveyard (W. H. Allen, 1979: Coronet, 1980)

TERRIBLE TALES From The GERMAN. (Gibbings, London, 1891: Reeves, London, 1912)

Anon – The Crystal Dagger.
Anon – A Strange Bride. (aka ‘The Death-Bride’)
Anon – The Host of “The Sun.”
Baron De La Motte Fouque -The Crazy Half-Heller.
Anon – The Goldsmith of the Rue Nicaise.

TERRIBLE TALES From THE ITALIAN. (Gibbings, London, 1891: Reeves, London, 1912)

Anon – The Bridal Wreath
Anon – Domenico Matteo
Anon – The Betrothed.
Anon – The Story of the Lady Erminia.
Anon – The Brigands.
Anon – The Village Priest.
Anon – Eurispe.
Anon – Lanucci.
Anon – The Lovers.
Anon – The Unlucky Fortune.

TERRIBLE TALES From THE FRENCH (Gibbings, London, 1891: Reeves, London, 1912)

Erckmann-Chatrian – The Mysterious Sketch.
Anon – The Weaver of Steinbach.
Anon – The Lyons Courier.
Erckmann-Chatrian – The Cabalist.
Erckmann-Chatrian – The Citizen’s Watch.
Anon – A Scene in the Desert.
Erckmann-Chatrian – Cousin Elof’s Dream.
Anon – A Legend of Marseilles
Erckmann-Chatrian – The White and the Black
Anon – Lex Talionis.

TERRIBLE TALES From THE SPANISH. (Gibbings, London, 1891: Reeves, London, 1912)

Anon – The Golden Bracelet.
Anon – The Mirror of Friends.
Anon – The Green Eyes.
Anon – Jose Maria.
Anon – The Passion Flower.
Anon – The Thirteenth.
Anon – The Effect of being Unde­ceived.
Anon –  The White Doe.
G. Bequer – Maese Perez, the Organist.
Anon – Dorido and Clorinia.
Anon – The Moonbeam.
Anon – The Mountain of Spirits.


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21st Zardoz Paperbook & Pulp Fair: Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Posted by demonik on July 6, 2010

21st Zardoz Paperbook & Pulp Fair: Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Zardoz Pulp Fair 2010

i really can’t think of a better way to spend Halloween – which almost certainly means i’ll miss it again. hopefully, some of you will have better luck!

Sunday 31st October 2010
Park Plaza Hotel, 239 Vauxhall Bridge Road, London SW1V 1EQ. Nearest station: Victoria.
10 am – 4pm
Dealer Tables: £50 each
Admission: £3

further details: www.zardozbooks.co.uk

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M. J. Trow – A Brief History Of Vampires

Posted by demonik on July 6, 2010

M. J. Trow – A Brief History Of Vampires (Robinson, July 2010)

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Blurb:
Vampire culture is everywhere: in the bookshops, on TV, in nightclubs, and in the cinemas. With the success of the Twilight saga and True Blood, the lore of the undead is a global phenomenon. But where does the legend of the Vampire come from, and why does it have such a perennial appeal? Historian and vampire aficionado M. J. Trow goes in search of the origins of this blood craze a long way from the shopping malls, to the story of the fifteenth century Hungarian warrior prince, Vlad of Wallachia, who was famed for his brutality in war as well as his passion for excruciating torture. Vlad would later become the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the film Nosferatu.

Trow’s fascinating search uncovers the forgotten story of Vlad and charts his legacy throughout history up to the present day. He shows that the legend and lore of vampirism has evolved over centuries and still has a powerful hold on our imaginations.

Press Release Robinson
From Vlad the Impaler to Edward Cullen, M.J. Trow goes in search of the allure of the vampire.

A Brief History of Vampires

By M.J. Trow
Published by Robinson
July 8th 2010 Paperback, £8.99

A must-have book for all vampire fans, A Brief History of Vampires charts the phenomenal craze of ‘popular vampires’ such as Nosferatu and Count Dracula to screen vampires such as those played by Bela Lugosi and Robert Pattinson. With the current global vampire craze taking the book, film and TV charts by storms with the Twilight saga and True Blood, this book begs the question: why do we love to be frightened?

Within a society which has become increasingly desensitised to horror, M.J. Trow charts the vampire’s global phenomenon and seeks its terrifying origins. A long way from the billboard we learn the story of Vlad ‘The Impaler’ of Wallachia. a ruler infamous for his brutality in war as well as his passion for ‘impaling’ his victims, and who later became the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s infamous Dracula.

In order to uncover the fascinating, forgotten story of ‘The Impaler’, Trow looks into the history, legend and lore of his legacy. Compellingly and historically, he shows how the legend of the vampire has evolved over centuries and explains how it still has such an intense hold on modern day imagination.

About the Author
M. Trow studied history at university, after which he has spent years teaching. He is also an established crime writer and biographer, with a reputation as a scholar who peels away myths to reveal the true history behind them. Originally from Rhondda, South Wales, he now lives on the Isle of White.

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