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Gary Fry – Poe’s Progeny

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Gary Fry (ed.) – Poe’s Progeny (Gray Friars Press, Sept. 2005)

Robert Sammelin

Michael Marshall Smith – Introduction

Mike O’Driscoll – The Hurting House
Mark Morris – The Places They Hide
Antony Mann – Save The Snutch
Melvin Cartagena – Bottom Feeders
Tim Lebbon – A Ripple In The Veil
Steve Savile – Idiot Hearts
Joel Lane – A Night On Fire
Greg Beatty – Dr Jackman’s Lens
Chico Kidd – Unfinished Business
Conrad Williams – Once Seen
Jon Hartless – Earth, Water, Oil
Nicholas Royle – Sitting Tenant
Kathy Sedia – Making Ivy
Dominick Cancilla – The Cubicle Wall
Stephen Volk – The Good Unknown
Gary Fry – The Strange Case Of Jack Myride And Company
Andrew Hook – The Pregnant Sky
Gene Stewart – Evidence
Rhys Hughes – The Jam Of Hypnos
Gary McMahon – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Adam L. G. Nevill – Where Angels Come In
John L. Probert – The Volkendorf Exhibition
Allen Ashley – Turbulent Times
Richard Gavin – The Pale Lover
Kevin L. Donihe – Living Room Zombies
Neil Ayres – The Scent Of Nostalgia
Robert Swartwood – Goodbye
Simon Clark – One Man Show
Donald R. Burleson – Papa Loaty
Ramsey Campbell – Just Behind You

Blurb:

Too often contemporary horror fiction denies, forgets or is even unaware of its roots in classic dark literature. The man legitimately called the father of the genre, Edgar Allan Poe, thrust terror into the soul of humanity, while his illegitimate descendants located it in the cosmos, across nations, in science, through history, in nature, in the city — in short, wherever people come together and invariably attempt to dull their imaginations. But experience is always too cruel.

These themes are of course relevant today.

This book aims to show how the ideas and techniques of the greats might be utilised to explore the modern world. Here you’ll find neither pastiche nor period prose, rather thoroughly contemporary visions whose aging, tell-tale heart still beats with dismaying memory of the past and irrepressible fear for the future…

30 original stories from some of the finest practitioners in the field, including a brand new tale from modern master Ramsey Campbell.

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