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Archive for November 20th, 2009

Phil Baker – The Devil is a Gentleman: The Life and Times of Dennis Wheatley

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Phil Baker – The Devil is a Gentleman: The Life and Times of Dennis Wheatley (Dedalus, October 31st, 2009)

Cover design: Jonathan Barker

Cover design: Jonathan Barker

Blurb
One of the giants of popular fiction, with total sales of around fifty million books, Dennis Wheatley held twentieth-century Britain spellbound. His Black Magic novels like The Devil Rides Out created an oddly seductive and luxurious vision of Satanism, but in reality he was as interested in politics as occultism. Wheatley was closely involved with the secret intelligence community, and this powerfully researched study shows just how directly this drove his work, from his unlikely warnings about the menace of Satanic Trade Unionism to his role in a British scheme to engineer a revival of Islam.

Drawing on a wealth of unpublished material, Phil Baker examines Wheatley’s key friendship with a fraudster named Eric Gordon Tombe, and uncovers the full story of his sensational 1922 murder. Baker also explores Wheatley’s relationships with occult figures such as Rollo Ahmed, Aleister Crowley, and the Reverend Montague Summers, the shady priest and demonologist who inspired the memorably evil character of Canon Copely-Syle, in To The Devil – A Daughter.

Like Sax Rohmer and John Buchan, Wheatley has now moved from being perceived as dated to positively vintage, and this groundbreaking biography offers a major reassessment of his significance and status.

Click on the cute Dedalus logo for more info …..

link to Dedalus books

….. and then buy it for me for Christmas! :)

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Gary Fry – The Gray Friar Christmas Chapbook 2007

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Gary Fry (ed.) – The Gray Friar Christmas Chapbook 2007 (Gray Friar, 2008 [there was a printing delay])

 

[image]

Simon Strantzas

Nicholas Royle – Red Christmas
Gary McMahon – Loving Angels
Paul Finch – December
Simon Strantzas – The Uninvited Guest
Gary Fry – Just For You
Conrad Williams – Foreign Parts
John Llewellyn Probert – Last Christmas

 

As mentioned elsewhere, you get this as a free pdf whenever you order a title direct from Gray Friars Press and it’s well worth having, i can tell you. Mine came lacking a cover (grumble, moan, complain, etc), so (pilfer, steal, snatch, etc) i’ve swiped this from Simon Strantzas‘s blog.

Here, as far as i can make out, is the Gray Friars catalogue to date. I could be wrong but most (if not all?) are short story collections: as you can see, a respectable smattering of names familiar from Black Book Of Horror. Another plus, Gray Friars pride themselves on being “the true home of British horror” and they’re certainly having a good stab at living up to it.

Simon Bestwick – Pictures of the Dark
Paul Finch – Stains
Gary Fry – Mindful of Phantoms
Gary Fry – The Impelled & Other Head Trips
Gary McMahon – Dirty Prayers
Lisa Morton – The Castle of Los Angeles (forthcoming)
John Llewellyn Probert – The Catacombs of Fear
John Llewellyn Probert – The Faculty of Terror
Tony Richards – Passport to Purgatory
Stephen Volk – Dark Corners

Anthologies:
Gary Fry (ed.) – Bernie Herrmann’s Manic Sextet (Paul Finch, Donald Pulker, Andrew Hook, Gary McMahon, Adam L. G. Nevill, Rhys Hughes, Simon Strantzas)
Gary Fry (ed.) – Poe’s Progeny

Novellas series:
Conrad Williams – Rain
Steve Vernon – Hard Roads
Nicholas Royle – The Appetite
Paul Finch – Groaning Shadows
Stephen Volk – Vardoger

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Gary Fry – Poe’s Progeny

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Gary Fry (ed.) – Poe’s Progeny (Gray Friars Press, Sept. 2005)

Robert Sammelin

Michael Marshall Smith – Introduction

Mike O’Driscoll – The Hurting House
Mark Morris – The Places They Hide
Antony Mann – Save The Snutch
Melvin Cartagena – Bottom Feeders
Tim Lebbon – A Ripple In The Veil
Steve Savile – Idiot Hearts
Joel Lane – A Night On Fire
Greg Beatty – Dr Jackman’s Lens
Chico Kidd – Unfinished Business
Conrad Williams – Once Seen
Jon Hartless – Earth, Water, Oil
Nicholas Royle – Sitting Tenant
Kathy Sedia – Making Ivy
Dominick Cancilla – The Cubicle Wall
Stephen Volk – The Good Unknown
Gary Fry – The Strange Case Of Jack Myride And Company
Andrew Hook – The Pregnant Sky
Gene Stewart – Evidence
Rhys Hughes – The Jam Of Hypnos
Gary McMahon – While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Adam L. G. Nevill – Where Angels Come In
John L. Probert – The Volkendorf Exhibition
Allen Ashley – Turbulent Times
Richard Gavin – The Pale Lover
Kevin L. Donihe – Living Room Zombies
Neil Ayres – The Scent Of Nostalgia
Robert Swartwood – Goodbye
Simon Clark – One Man Show
Donald R. Burleson – Papa Loaty
Ramsey Campbell – Just Behind You

Blurb:

Too often contemporary horror fiction denies, forgets or is even unaware of its roots in classic dark literature. The man legitimately called the father of the genre, Edgar Allan Poe, thrust terror into the soul of humanity, while his illegitimate descendants located it in the cosmos, across nations, in science, through history, in nature, in the city — in short, wherever people come together and invariably attempt to dull their imaginations. But experience is always too cruel.

These themes are of course relevant today.

This book aims to show how the ideas and techniques of the greats might be utilised to explore the modern world. Here you’ll find neither pastiche nor period prose, rather thoroughly contemporary visions whose aging, tell-tale heart still beats with dismaying memory of the past and irrepressible fear for the future…

30 original stories from some of the finest practitioners in the field, including a brand new tale from modern master Ramsey Campbell.

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Gary Fry – Bernie Herrmann’s Manic Sextet

Posted by demonik on November 20, 2009

Gary Fry (ed.) – Bernie Herrmann’s Manic Sextet (Gray Friars, Dec. 2005)

Ben Baldwin

Mike O’Driscoll – Introduction

Paul Finch – Hobhook
Donald Pulker – Forced Perspective
Andrew Hook – Live From The Hippodrome
Gary McMahon – Like A Stone
Adam L. G. Nevill – The Other Occupant
Rhys Hughes – The Hydrothermal Reich
Simon Strantzas – Fading Light

Blurb

Edgar Allan Poe suggested that the short story was the ideal vehicle for the dark tale, yet some of the finest ever written — to take just two examples, Algernon Blackwood’s ‘The Willows’ and H. P. Lovecraft’s ‘The Colour Out Of Space’ — are far longer. The novella, or novelette, is an enduringly popular form in the field of imaginative literature, yet few books celebrate it exclusively.

This collection seeks to show how the longer short story, or the very short novel, is ideally suited to the demands of creating an atmosphere, telling an involving tale, and developing compelling characters. The authors here are all masters of their craft: they know how to combine economy with broad visions of fear.

Let their chill melody seduce you; discordant imagery awaits; infectious rhythms will drive you wild with dread.

Six outstanding pieces from some of today’s bleakest prodigies. Let the music commence…

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