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Archive for September 2nd, 2007

Dennis Wheatley – A Century Of Horror Stories

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Dennis Wheatley (ed.) – A Century Of Horror Stories (Hutchinson, 1935)


[image]

Detail from the cover

Introduction – Dennis Wheatley

Algernon Blackwood – Ancient Sorceries
H. T. W. Bousfield – The Unknown Island
Margaret Irwin – The Earlier Service
Guy Endore – Lazarus Returns
L. A. G. Strong – Breakdown
Evelyn Waugh – The Man Who Liked Dickens
Mrs. Oliphant – The Open Door
Augustus Muir – The Reptile
Saki – The Music On The Hill
F. Tennyson Jesse – The Canary
Arthur Machen – The Great God Pan
H. G. Wells – The Red Room
R. H. Barham – The Leech Of Folkestone
Ex Private X (A. M. Burrage) – Smee
Ex Private X (A. M. Burrage) – One Who Saw
Francis Isles – Dark Journey
E. W. Hornung – The Fate Of Faustina
Martin Armstrong – The Pipe-Smoker
William Younger – The Angelus
Edgar Allan Poe – The Case Of M. Valdemar
Michael Joseph – A Glass Of Milk
Blanche Bane Kuder – From What Strange Land
Honore de Balzac – El Verdugo
Richard Hughes – Poor Man’s Inn
E. M. Winch – A La Tartare
Sir Hugh Clifford – The Ghoul
F. Marion Crawford – The Dead Smile
T. F. Powys – The House With The Echo
A. E. Coppard – Arabesque: The Mouse
Alec Waugh – The Last Chukka
John Metcalfe – Mr. Meldrum’s Mania
Wilkie Collins – A Terribly Strange Bed
Theodore Drieser – The Hand
Thomas Burke – The Bird
M. R. James – The Treasure Of Abbot Thomas
Guy de Maupassant – Vendetta
Ambrose Bierce – An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge
James Hilton – The Mallet
Hugh Walpole – The Silver Mask
Bram Stoker – The Judges House
Mark Channing – The Feet
Louis Golding – The Call Of The Hand
Bernard Bromage – The House
Walter De La Mare – All Hallows
C. E. Montague – The First Blood Sweep
John Russell – The Fourth Man
John Russell – The Price Of The Head
John Russell – The Lost God
William Hope Hodgson – The Island Of The Ud
William Hope Hodgson – The Whistling Room
William Hope Hodgson – The Derelict
Dennis Wheatley – The Snake

1024 pages. They don’t make ’em like this any more …
Wheatley reproduced several of the stories over two Arrow paperbacks, “Shafts Of Fear” and “Quiver Of Horror” for Arrow in 1964, adding two new Charles Birkin stories and his own A Life For A Life.

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Dennis Wheatley – Quiver Of Horror

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Dennis Wheatley (ed.) – Quiver Of Horror (Arrow, 1964)

Introduction – Dennis Wheatley

Margaret Irwin – The Earlier Service
Mrs. Oliphant – The Open Door
Saki – The Music On The Hill
F. Tennyson Jesse – The Canary
Ex Private X (A. M. Burrage) – Smee
Ex Private X (A. M. Burrage) – One Who Saw
William Younger – The Angelus
Theodore Drieser – The Hand
M. R. James – The Treasure Of Abbot Thomas
Bram Stoker – The Judges House
Louis Golding – The Call Of The Hand
Walter De La Mare – All Hallows
William Hope Hodgson – The Whistling Room
Charles Birkin – A Right To Know
Dennis Wheatley – A Life For A Life

A new introduction (repeated in both volumes) and the two Birkin stories would be reason enough for some of us to buy this. The C. E. Montague war story is a forgotten gem (the sweepstake involves betting on which of you will be next to die), otherwise the best of this stuff is more easily obtainable elsewhere.

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Dennis Wheatley – Shafts Of Fear

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Dennis Wheatley (ed.) – Shafts Of Fear (Arrow, 1964)

Introduction – Dennis Wheatley

Evelyn Waugh – The Man Who Liked Dickens
Martin Armstrong – The Pipe-Smoker
Michael Joseph – A Glass Of Milk
William Hope Hodgson – The Island Of The Ud
William Hope Hodgson – The Derelict
T. F. Powys – The House With The Echo
A. E. Coppard – Arabesque: The Mouse
Alec Waugh – The Last Chukka
Charles Birkin – A Lovely Bunch Of Coconuts
Thomas Burke – The Bird
Guy de Maupassant – Vendetta
James Hilton – The Mallet
Hugh Walpole – The Silver Mask
C. E. Montague – The First Blood Sweep
John Russell – The Fourth Man
John Russell – The Price Of The Head
John Russell – The Lost God
Ambrose Bierce – A Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge
Dennis Wheatley – The Snake

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Paperback Fanatic

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

The first issue of the legendary Justin Cultprint’s excellent The Paperback Fanatic (“The British magazine for collectors of pulp fiction”) is available now and if you enjoy browsing ‘seventies book covers this is certainly the magazine for you! The highlight for me is the catalogue of Sphere’s ‘seventies horror titles and there are also features on tacky kung-fu novels, the many faces of Paul Tabori and a piece on violent cops ‘The Special Squad’.

Here’s the cover!

Order your copy via paypal
justin@justincultprint.free-online.co.uk

£3 post-paid UK
£5 post-paid mainland Europe
$8 post-paid to US and Canada.

A Vault Of Evil version of the Sphere article is now available online here. My thanks to Justin for giving me permision to do this.

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Linda Lovecraft – More Devil’s Kisses

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Linda Lovecraft [Michel Parry] (ed.) – More Devil’s Kisses (Corgi, 1977)

[image]

Introduction – Linda Lovecraft

Mary E. Counselman – Something Old
Maurice Level – The Last Kiss
H. R. Wakefield – Monstrous Regiment
May Sinclair – The Nature of the Evidence
R. Chetwynd-Hayes – The Fly-by-Night
Jerome Bixby – The Best Lover In Hell
Erika Johansson – Some Like It Cold
Angela Carter – Master
Ramsey Campbell – Loveman’s Comeback
Joseph F. Pumilia – Toad
Steven Utley – Sidhe
David Drake – Smokie Joe
Chris Miller – The Magic Show

Famously withdrawn and existing stock pulped after Scotland Yard took an interest in Chris Miller’s story.

Maurice Level – The Last Kiss: A husband, blinded and hideously deformed when his wife through vitriol in his face after he threatened to leave her, intervenes on her behalf when the case comes to court, preventing her from receiving a long jail sentence. At his request she pays him an emotional visit in which she begs his forgiveness and somehow even manages to kiss him, whereupon … Well, not for nothing is Level feted as a master practitioner of the conte cruel.

Jerome Bixby – The Best Lover In Hell: Jim Maddock, sinner, seducer, adulterer and all round fornicator, encounters the Devil in the SW corner of Gehenna. “The lava had burned most of the skin off his torso – raw patches of flesh showed – his lips were cracked, his hair was gone, and his earlobes were crackly black husks. But he laughed.” Jim offers the Devil a challenge, namely to prove which of them is the better lover. Jim has a lot of fun – with Cleopatra, Marie Antoinette, Madame Bovary & co. – in coming off second best and earns himself the coveted position of special honorary demon who must guard the corridor wherein lie these beauties for all eternity. And “satisfy utterly their every demand”.

Angela Carter – Master: “…had first exercised a propensity for savagery in the acrid lavatories of a minor English Public School where he used to press the heads of the new boys into the ceramic bowl and then pull the flush upon them to drown their gurgling protests. After puberty, he turned his indefinable but exacerbated rage upon the pale, flinching bodies of young women whose flesh he lacerated with his teeth, fingernails and sometimes his leather belt in the beds of cheap hotels near London’s great rail terminus.

It is in Africa he meets his match in the form of a native girl he buys and systematically brutalises. Syphilitic and insane, he leaves a trail of innumerable jaguar corpses across the continent until she, by now quite as degenerate as her master, metamorphosises into a jaguar-woman ….

R. Chetwynd-Hayes – The Fly-By-Night: Tobias the cat is forever leaving presents on the carpet for owners Newton Hatfield and his daughter Celia. One evening they return home to find an odd creature, ‘pretty’, fanged and leathery of wing which Celia adopts although Newton is far from keen. The Fly-by-night feeds on extreme human emotion of the darkest hue, and when Newton comes close to murdering his daughter in an argument, he realises it’s time to destroy it. Problem is, the creature has grown considerably by now and he’s also gotten around to ravishing Celia.

Joseph F. Pumilia – Toad: An ugly teenager, despised by his contemporaries, Toad is so called because of his facial resemblance to that warty creature. So how comes he’s so popular with the women teachers?

Erika Johansson – Some Like It Cold: Bo Rosenkwist wants to be the first man to have sex at the North Pole and persuades Barbro, a trainee gym instructor, to partner him. Barbro frets about the Ice Giants “said to keep up their numbers by taking over the bodies of travellers frozen in the snow”, but Bo has too much on his mind to pay her any heed. On their first night at the Pole, Barbro wanders naked from their tent and Bo has his first and last encounter with frosty the snowman and his mates.

Chris Miller – The Magic Show: As mentioned (many times) above, the story that lead to the book being trashed after an intervention from Scotland Yard’s finest. Mrs. Levine hires a magic show for son Ira’s seventh birthday party. While the parents congratulate her on such a marvellous idea, Dr. Fun and Mr. Frog organise a drug fuelled, infant orgy next door. Just when you think it can’t get any worse, a pony is introduced into the proceedings …

Posted in *Corgi*, Linda Lovecraft, Michel Parry | Leave a Comment »

Stephen Jones & Jo Fletcher – Gaslight And Ghosts

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Stephen Jones & Jo Fletcher (eds.) – Gaslight And Ghosts  (World Fantasy Convention/ Robinsons, 1988)


gaslight&ghosts

Introduction: A Ripping Yarn – Stephen Jones & Jo Fletcher

James Herbert – Halloween’s Child
Neil Gamman – James Herbert: Growing Up In Public
Dianna Wynne Jones – The Green Stone
Clive Barker – The Rhapsodist
Hugh Lamb – Victorian Terror
Garry Kilworth – Beyond Byzantium
Brian Lumley – The Writer In The Garret
Ian Watson – The Case Of The Glass Slipper
R. Chetwynd-Hayes – Fog Ghost
Peter Tremayne – A Reflection Of Ghosts
Robert Holdstock – Time Of The Tree
Ramsey Campbell – Cat And Mouse
Brian W. Aldiss – Forgotten Life
Karl E. Wagner – Beyond Any Measure
Mike Ashley – Unlocking The Night
Terry Pratchett – Sphinx
Barbara Hambly – Immortal Blood
Lisa Tuttle – The Modern Prometheus
Adrian Cole – Grimander
Kim Newman – The Long Autumn Of 1888
Charles L. Grant – Snowman

Weird amalgam of horror and fantasy stories, artwork, articles, extracts from then-forthcoming novels, ads and co., loosely based around a Jack The Ripper/ Victorian theme, although many of the items don’t come within spitting distance. The overall effect is like an extended, hardcover issue of Fantasy Tales magazine.

For me, the articles are the selling point, specifically these four: Hugh Lamb contributes an excellent – if too brief – examination of the golden age of Victorian horror fiction; Mike Ashley commemorates Christine Campbell Thomson and the Not At Nights, and Tremayne does the same for Dorothy Macardle, latter day editor of Weird Tales and author of Uneasy Freehold. finally, Kim Newman contributes an annotated listing of Jack the Ripper movies and TV appearances.

As to the short stories, Beyond Any Measure has to be the stand out, a vampire/ doppelganger classic, and the Campbell is resurrected from an early Michel Parry anthology. Fog Ghost seems to have been written to order, but it’s mercifully free of the heavy-handed humour that blights some of RCH’s other work. Hallowe’en Child is reputedly based on a true incident on the night Herbert’s daughter was born.

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Amy Myers – After Midnight Stories 4

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Amy Myers (ed.) – The Fourth Book of After Midnight Stories (William Kimber, 1987)

After Midnight Stories 4

 

Cover: ionicus


R. Chetwynd-Hayes – Regression
Brian Lumley – Dead On Time
Elizabeth Foust – Edna’s Good Fortune
J. C. Trewin – Good Night, Good Night!
Jean Stubbs – An Evening At The Cromers’
Janet S. Goldfinch – The Stockingers
John Whitbourn – Roots
Barbara Joan Eyre – Jessica
Derek Stanford – The Masque
Mary Williams – Three Of Us
Fred Urquhart – Lillie Langtry’s Silver Cup
Joan Rees – Enchanting Cottage
Frances Stephens – Mountain Men
Alma Priestley – Gowks
Patricia Daly – Narcissus
Ross McKay – The Woodshed Door

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Amy Myers – 3rd After Midnight Stories

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Amy Myers (ed.) – The Third Book of After Midnight Stories (William Kimber, 1987)

After Midnight Stories 3

 

Cover: ionicus


Brian Lumley – The Thin People
Alma Priestley – The Neapolitan Bedroom
R. Chetwynd-Hayes – Moving Day
A. L. Barker – Element Of Doubt
J. C. Trewin – The Manse
John Whitbourn – Waiting For A Bus
Jean Stubbs – The Band in the Park
Ross McKay – The Indian’s Grave
Mike Sims – Warm As Snow
Derek Stanford – Meeting Mr. Singleton
Meg Buxton – The Neighbours
John Marsh – The Whisperer
Kelvin I. Jones – Mandrake
Fred Urquhart – Swing High, Willie Brodie
Lanyon Jones – The Nine Lessons and Carols

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Richard Dalby & Rosemary Pardoe – Ghosts and Scholars

Posted by demonik on September 2, 2007

Richard Dalby & Rosemary Pardoe (eds.)Ghosts and Scholars: Ghost Stories In The Tradition Of M. R. James (Crucible, 1987: Equation, 1989)

Ghosts & Scholars


Foreword – Michael Cox
Introduction – Rosemary Pardoe & Richard Dalby
M. R. James – Ghosts-Treat Them Gently

Sabine Baring-Gould – On the Leads
‘B’ – The Stone Coffin
A.C. Benson – The Slype House
R. Hugh Benson – Father Macclesfield’s Tale
Cecil Binney – The Saint and the Vicar
Sir Andrew Caldecott – Christmas Reunion
Ramsey Campbell – This Time
Patrick Carleton – Dr Horder’s Room
Carter Dickson (John Dickson Carr) – Blind Man’s Hood
Frederick Cowles – The Strange Affair at Upton Strangewold
‘Ingulphus’ (Arthur Gray) – Brother John’s Bequest
Sheila Hodgson – ‘Come, Follow!’
M. R. James – Ghost Story Competition
Winifred Galbraith – ‘Here He Lies Where He Longed to Be’
Emma S. Duffin – The House-Party
A. F. Kidd – An Incident in the City
Shane Leslie – As In a Glass Dimly
R. H. Malden – Between Sunset and Moonrise
L. T. C. Rolt – New Corner
David G. Rowlands – Sins of the Fathers
Eleanor Scott – Celui-La
Arnold Smith – The Face in the Fresco
Dermot Chesson Spence – The Dean’s Bargain
Lewis Spence – The Horn of Vapula
Montague Summers – The Grimoire
E. G. Swain – The Eastern Window

Select Bibliography

An extension of one of Britain’s finest small press publications, this collection traces the influence of James upon his contemporaries and later authors, right through to present day masters like Ramsey Campbell. There’s little by way of gore and violence, nor are too many crabs known to rampage through these crypts and Cathedrals. What these stories have to offer is an undeniable shuddersome quality courtesy of the many mouldering revenants who show themselves to the usual array of hapless antiquarians.

See also the excellent Ghosts & Scholars archive

Perhaps of slightly lesser import, the Vault Of Evil G&S thread

Posted in *Crucible*, Richard Dalby, Rosemary Pardoe | Leave a Comment »